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View Full Version : Why is Flooring Removed to Expose Sub-Floor on Larger Aquariums.


JaysLittleOcean
08/07/2017, 09:22 AM
Good Morning All. The title of this thread pretty much says it all. I'm looking to understand the rationale behind removing flooring to expose the subfloor before placing a large aquarium down in that spot? I am looking to start a new build and I cannot decide whether or not I want to put it in the living on the first floor where all can see or in the basement. Understanding the whole flooring thing would help my decide.

mcgyvr
08/07/2017, 09:28 AM
To establish a solid base really..

If you have carpet floor it can/will get crushed and not stay stable..

Other flooring materials should stay stable though.. (wood floor,etc...)

Tile may crack due to point loading which could break up over time and again cause instability/not consistent floor thickness..

No real rocket science here..
Just can your existing flooring material stay stable/flat base under the load..

Frankly I can't see any issue with leaving the flooring...
But one could say that well if the carpet gets wet/moldy it will need to be removed.. Well.. same goes for any subfloor material..

JaysLittleOcean
08/07/2017, 09:57 AM
Thanks Mcqyvr, appreciate the input. I would figure that placing in direct contact with sub-flooring would still make it an issue if you spill water unless some type of water proofing or water draining system in placed in between.


To establish a solid base really..

If you have carpet floor it can/will get crushed and not stay stable..

Other flooring materials should stay stable though.. (wood floor,etc...)

Tile may crack due to point loading which could break up over time and again cause instability/not consistent floor thickness..

No real rocket science here..
Just can your existing flooring material stay stable/flat base under the load..

Frankly I can't see any issue with leaving the flooring...
But one could say that well if the carpet gets wet/moldy it will need to be removed.. Well.. same goes for any subfloor material..

adeebm
08/07/2017, 03:13 PM
As mcgyver said, it's mostly for a stable base. Carpet can be uneven. When I setup my 180g, I had to shim the stand, and also I'm sure the carpet slope will change as it settles. If you want waterproofing, you can expose the subfloor and coat with epoxy appliance paint. Of course, the surrounding floor will still be at risk.

Clowning_Around
08/07/2017, 05:41 PM
Like others said, i.e. a judgement call.... So to help what gallons n flooring do you have?

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Potatohead
08/07/2017, 06:07 PM
I have a floating engineered hardwood floor in my fish room, my 210 I put on the slab and built the floor around it, but my 70 is on the floor. As long as the floor can move with temperature and humidity changes that is all that really matters. If the floor is carpet or glued down I don't see any reason to pull it up.

Clowning_Around
08/07/2017, 06:35 PM
Another factor how long would you guess its going to remain setup....

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dimasv
08/07/2017, 06:53 PM
I am not an expert but had my 30 gal long time ago in condo on top of laminate. Had abs no problems had couple of floodings laminate was damaged a bit but not crazy. Would not put it on hard wood. Now i set it up in basement. Laydown tiles beneath it. How ever i think the stand i have might work for anybody. It has levels at each leg and easy to get to floor if u have flooding

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der_wille_zur_macht
08/07/2017, 08:11 PM
The only time I've ever pulled flooring up has been when I was doing a built-in aquarium. Everything else - large or small - has gone directly on the floor (hardwood, engineered, carpet, etc).

I could see unique scenarios where you'd want to alter the floor, but I don't think I would consider it a default for any typical tank size going on properly installed flooring in good condition.

ca1ore
08/08/2017, 06:21 AM
The only time I've ever pulled flooring up has been when I was doing a built-in aquarium. Everything else - large or small - has gone directly on the floor (hardwood, engineered, carpet, etc).

I could see unique scenarios where you'd want to alter the floor, but I don't think I would consider it a default for any typical tank size going on properly installed flooring in good condition.

Yeah, exactly. Not sure where the OP got the idea that it's 'routine'. My large tank does not have carpet underneath, but that's because the tank was there before I put down carpet :lol:

JaysLittleOcean
08/08/2017, 04:43 PM
Thanks for the input all. Decided that the spot on the upper floor really didn't allow me to build the aquarium I have been dreaming off. Instead I am going to build the aquarium in the lower level of our home which I am in the process of converting into my home office space so I have a solid slab of concrete for me to build on.

Clowning_Around
08/08/2017, 06:27 PM
Cool planning is critical, share pics once you start

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JaysLittleOcean
08/08/2017, 07:00 PM
Cool planning is critical, share pics once you start

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Definitely will do. Thanks all.