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Razorback reef
08/13/2017, 11:18 PM
After drilling my 40 breeder today I thought I would share my steps used to do it.

First, I cut a 1.5 inch hole in a 1 inch thick board and clamped it in place. This insures that the drill is straight and doesn't move while drilling.

Next, I used duct tape on the inside underneath. This prevents the glass from falling and chipping when it cuts through.

The last step was to fill the hole in the board with vegetable oil. Everyone uses water, but water only cools the tool, it doesn't lubricate. The best oil to use for grinding is olive oil, but corn oil or vegetable oil will work.

prsnlty
08/14/2017, 03:27 AM
Looks great! Thanks for sharing :D

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Clowning_Around
08/14/2017, 06:19 AM
You dont want to lubricate, you only want to cool. You want too lubricate when you cut, such as steel. You want to cool when you grind. Diamond bits are effectively scratching there way through the surface, hence the slower speed. By lubricating in that process you are making it take even longer by allowing some slippage. I dont imagine it hurt anything just not optimal.

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billdogg
08/14/2017, 06:50 AM
You dont want to lubricate, you only want to cool. You want too lubricate when you cut, such as steel. You want to cool when you grind. Diamond bits are effectively scratching there way through the surface, hence the slower speed. By lubricating in that process you are making it take even longer by allowing some slippage. I dont imagine it hurt anything just not optimal.

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My thoughts as well.

ca1ore
08/14/2017, 10:20 AM
Agreed. You're grinding, not cutting. Probably overthinking it ...... an occupational hazard in this hobby :lol: I've found a wood template to be a great way to start the hole, but best removed once the groove is ground deeply enough to keep the bit in place.

Clowning_Around
08/14/2017, 02:52 PM
I like using a scrap glass template for what it's worth...

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Razorback reef
08/14/2017, 07:20 PM
Alright, but when your bit catches and breaks the glass because it isn't lubricated just pour some more water on it. I'm a tool and die machinist, I'm not overthinking anything, I know exactly what it requires to make a clean smooth grind without chipping or cracking.

Honestly, I wasn't in the mood to just gamble on a straight grind even though I only paid $50 for the tank. Any shakiness or sudden slips and there goes the glass.

LQT
08/15/2017, 01:48 PM
So when you use oil, you forgo using water?

Clowning_Around
08/15/2017, 05:42 PM
I stand behind my original comment. When cutting cement, concrete, tile, ceramic, grout, glass, stone, brick and similar elements water is preferred choice unlike machining steel with cutting oil or wax for woods etc.. Still I don't think using an oil was a bad thing just not optimal and if it helped your comfort level more power to ya, glad it worked you :)

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