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View Full Version : What's the trick to reds?


sprite
08/20/2017, 07:22 PM
I've never been able to bring it the nice red color. Doesn't matter what lighting I've used... Mh,t5,or LED. It's always a dull reddish brown. :mixed::mixed:

Pife
08/20/2017, 07:28 PM
There are very very few red corals imho. It isn't just you.

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zsuman101
08/21/2017, 11:35 AM
Potassium

sprite
08/21/2017, 12:24 PM
PotassiumWas 420 last I checked

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ozmosis7
08/21/2017, 12:51 PM
Kind of depends on the coral I think. My PC rainbow was green as green can be until a local reefer advised I move it down (I had it in the upper 2/3s of the tank). Now I have it in the lower 1/3 and it's getting all sorts of orange and red. Sometimes the trick is placement.

sprite
08/21/2017, 01:34 PM
My red planet was red when I brought it home from the lfs. It was under t5 there and now under LED it's dull maroon

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ozmosis7
08/21/2017, 02:23 PM
I've seen some planets do that. Not sure it's unusual. Changing things up could help it.

GSMclowns
08/21/2017, 02:58 PM
Bringing out the red color in SPS is one of those things that I have tried doing for years but always failed. All other colors are great but never red. I have read many threads online about this issue, some people suggested high light, potassium, feed more, clear water, better generic pieces. At one point, I had 4 red planets or corals that look like it in my tank but the end result is the same, can't get those bright, refreshing red color like I see in other people tank or pictures. I tried following all the suggestions and still nothing.

The funny thing is that there are few local reefers that actually get really nice red planets but their system isn't that much different than mine.

It isn't Calcium reactor because I have seen systems that dose BRS alk/Cal and systems that use calcium reactor and both systems get very nice Red color.
It isn't BB or DSB because I have seen systems that run BB and DSB that have nice red color.
It might not be potassium because I dosed my tank with Potassium and tested for it with high number.
It isn't the food because I flooded my tank with different frozen foods and additives but also have a very good nutrient export (giant skimmer, gfo, carbon, water change)
I also thought that my red planet isn't real red planet, so I got 4 of them from different sources and they all ended up the same color wise.
It might not be the light because I have the red planet at different level of light from 200 Par to 400 Par, still no red.

I asked those local reefer on how they get such a nice red color and they told me they just don't know. They don't know of any secret to it, they just put the coral in and it is red like that.

sprite
08/21/2017, 03:13 PM
Bringing out the red color in SPS is one of those things that I have tried doing for years but always failed. All other colors are great but never red. I have read many threads online about this issue, some people suggested high light, potassium, feed more, clear water, better generic pieces. At one point, I had 4 red planets or corals that look like it in my tank but the end result is the same, can't get those bright, refreshing red color like I see in other people tank or pictures. I tried following all the suggestions and still nothing.

The funny thing is that there are few local reefers that actually get really nice red planets but their system isn't that much different than mine.

It isn't Calcium reactor because I have seen systems that dose BRS alk/Cal and systems that use calcium reactor and both systems get very nice Red color.
It isn't BB or DSB because I have seen systems that run BB and DSB that have nice red color.
It might not be potassium because I dosed my tank with Potassium and tested for it with high number.
It isn't the food because I flooded my tank with different frozen foods and additives but also have a very good nutrient export (giant skimmer, gfo, carbon, water change)
I also thought that my red planet isn't real red planet, so I got 4 of them from different sources and they all ended up the same color wise.
It might not be the light because I have the red planet at different level of light from 200 Par to 400 Par, still no red.

I asked those local reefer on how they get such a nice red color and they told me they just don't know. They don't know of any secret to it, they just put the coral in and it is red like that.Must be nice to not know and still get it [emoji23]

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reefmutt
08/21/2017, 07:24 PM
phosphates?? having some? I really couldn't add anything constructive, i don't think..
I would have said more intense lighting/higher par - Ive certainly heard that the red planet responds to high par by turning red..
I would agree with ozmosis.. placement is probably an important factor..

Cheapreef
08/21/2017, 08:28 PM
I would have said more intense lighting/higher par - Ive certainly heard that the red planet responds to high par by turning red..


Not on my Red Planet, higher the PAR the greener the it becomes. Polyps stay red but skin turns green, lower in the tank-less PAR turns red.

Pife
08/21/2017, 09:01 PM
Not on my Red Planet, higher the PAR the greener the it becomes. Polyps stay red but skin turns green, lower in the tank-less PAR turns red.That's backwards to everyone that I know with one.

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Big E
08/22/2017, 06:32 AM
Most tanks can get nutrients to a level to pull colors as the range is fairly wide. The rest is up to correct lighting. For all colors you have to consider three variables--- spectrum, intensity, and what our eyes see.

Most reefers run their Sps tanks too blue which won't meet the spectrum and what we see for reds.

----------------------------------------------

Spectrum- Look at the chart below........you have to satisfy every point on there if you want good colors across the board in respect to coral pigment excitation and emission of the colors. If you look to the where reds are emitted/fluoresce you need spectrum approx. in that 500-590nm range.....if you don't have that you won't get that color.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4294/36265368615_785195380f_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/XfDuC8)Pigment chart (https://flic.kr/p/XfDuC8) by Big E 52 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/), on Flickr

What we see---

Our eyes see certain colors better based on what the overall brightness and ambience is of the lighting. It's easy to see green, orange and yellow in a bluer light(darker) but reds and purples & some blues can be muted.

We all know 420nm-460nm can supplement colors and make them pop more but if you go overboard and darken the tank you lose that visual pop in some colors.

Placement/intensity--

If you can get the spectrum and visual part set then it's just a matter of placement (intensity) for each specific coral.............for example to pull reds on a table acro or a milli it's likely you need more intensity. For a red dragon it needs less intensity to pull deeper reds.

The spectrum needs to be consistent across the whole length and width of the tank. The reason is that if you only have pockets of the right spectrum for a specific red pigment (or any pigment) and place the coral in an area where it's not getting that spectrum it won't produce the color you want.
Very few reef setups accomplish this or make it a priority.

Red Corals--

I agree that there aren't a lot of pure red corals but there are enough nice acros with bright red polyps or skin and polyps to get some nice red pop. That's where you have to hunt for them and not by name but by how they actually look in someone's tank.

If you can't get a Red Planet to deep red than it's likely you aren't meeting one of the three variables I mentioned above.

sprite
08/22/2017, 06:48 AM
Most tanks can get nutrients to a level to pull colors as the range is fairly wide. The rest is up to correct lighting. For all colors you have to consider three variables--- spectrum, intensity, and what our eyes see.

Most reefers run their Sps tanks too blue which won't meet the spectrum and what we see for reds.

----------------------------------------------

Spectrum- Look at the chart below........you have to satisfy every point on there if you want good colors across the board in respect to coral pigment excitation and emission of the colors. If you look to the where reds are emitted/fluoresce you need spectrum approx. in that 500-590nm range.....if you don't have that you won't get that color.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4294/36265368615_785195380f_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/XfDuC8)Pigment chart (https://flic.kr/p/XfDuC8) by Big E 52 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/), on Flickr

What we see---

Our eyes see certain colors better based on what the overall brightness and ambience is of the lighting. It's easy to see green, orange and yellow in a bluer light(darker) but reds and purples & some blues can be muted.

We all know 420nm-460nm can supplement colors and make them pop more but if you go overboard and darken the tank you lose that visual pop in some colors.

Placement/intensity--

If you can get the spectrum and visual part set then it's just a matter of placement (intensity) for each specific coral.............for example to pull reds on a table acro or a milli it's likely you need more intensity. For a red dragon it needs less intensity to pull deeper reds.

The spectrum needs to be consistent across the whole length and width of the tank. The reason is that if you only have pockets of the right spectrum for a specific red pigment (or any pigment) and place the coral in an area where it's not getting that spectrum it won't produce the color you want.
Very few reef setups accomplish this or make it a priority.

Red Corals--

I agree that there aren't a lot of pure red corals but there are enough nice acros with bright red polyps or skin and polyps to get some nice red pop. That's where you have to hunt for them and not by name but by how they actually look in someone's tank.

If you can't get a Red Planet to deep red than it's likely you aren't meeting one of the three variables I mentioned above.Awesome post.. Thank you

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reefmutt
08/22/2017, 07:26 AM
Most tanks can get nutrients to a level to pull colors as the range is fairly wide. The rest is up to correct lighting. For all colors you have to consider three variables--- spectrum, intensity, and what our eyes see.

Most reefers run their Sps tanks too blue which won't meet the spectrum and what we see for reds.

----------------------------------------------

Spectrum- Look at the chart below........you have to satisfy every point on there if you want good colors across the board in respect to coral pigment excitation and emission of the colors. If you look to the where reds are emitted/fluoresce you need spectrum approx. in that 500-590nm range.....if you don't have that you won't get that color.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4294/36265368615_785195380f_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/XfDuC8)Pigment chart (https://flic.kr/p/XfDuC8) by Big E 52 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/), on Flickr

What we see---

Our eyes see certain colors better based on what the overall brightness and ambience is of the lighting. It's easy to see green, orange and yellow in a bluer light(darker) but reds and purples & some blues can be muted.

We all know 420nm-460nm can supplement colors and make them pop more but if you go overboard and darken the tank you lose that visual pop in some colors.

Placement/intensity--

If you can get the spectrum and visual part set then it's just a matter of placement (intensity) for each specific coral.............for example to pull reds on a table acro or a milli it's likely you need more intensity. For a red dragon it needs less intensity to pull deeper reds.

The spectrum needs to be consistent across the whole length and width of the tank. The reason is that if you only have pockets of the right spectrum for a specific red pigment (or any pigment) and place the coral in an area where it's not getting that spectrum it won't produce the color you want.
Very few reef setups accomplish this or make it a priority.

Red Corals--

I agree that there aren't a lot of pure red corals but there are enough nice acros with bright red polyps or skin and polyps to get some nice red pop. That's where you have to hunt for them and not by name but by how they actually look in someone's tank.

If you can't get a Red Planet to deep red than it's likely you aren't meeting one of the three variables I mentioned above.

It is always good to have a methodical scientist amongst us.
Very informative, Ed!

Sprite, if you are not familiar with Ed's equally interesting and informative thread, here ya go!
http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?p=25188858#post25188858
Well worth the read.

sprite
08/22/2017, 08:29 AM
It is always good to have a methodical scientist amongst us.
Very informative, Ed!

Sprite, if you are not familiar with Ed's equally interesting and informative thread, here ya go!
http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?p=25188858#post25188858
Well worth the read.Thanks reefmutt, will check it out!

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Cheapreef
08/22/2017, 10:09 AM
That's backwards to everyone that I know with one.

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Not as far I have seen, I have 3-4 buddies with the same ORA Red Planet. Higher up green skin, lower red. What I've always been told on the RP.

bshow24
08/23/2017, 06:17 PM
You're not the only one obviously. Red definitely not the easiest color, but luckily, not too many corals with a pure red.

As for Red Planet, the higher intensity the light, the more red it gets. This is from experience and directly from the company (ORA) who released it.

Piper27
08/24/2017, 05:57 AM
Cheap reef, I also agree that red planets need higher par to get the red color fully saturated. Never heard or seen one in low par getting more red.

My two cents would be to run lower Kelvin halides. 10 and 12k bulbs actually bring out better red than 20k spectrums. Lower light always makes a red coral greener ime. Lower 10 and 12k bulbs also gave me the most intense blues as well and helped yellows too.

I have not seen potassium become a factor in coral colors unless it is extremely low, and normally you will see monti have issues before acros colors change for the wlrse. From low potassium.