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View Full Version : Who uses algae reactors?


RussC
09/12/2017, 07:39 PM
What kind of luck have you had using algae reactors to grow Chaeto and copepods? I'm about to start testing phosphorous. Got a new tank so I'm sure its coming. But I know I want to get a healthy population of copepods so I can later get a Mandarin fish and figured this would help. I'm thinking an algae reactor might work since I don't have a designated refugium. But what about putting just the chaeto in my sump contained in a basket or something? It just needs water flow and light, right?

mcgyvr
09/13/2017, 04:43 AM
I would not consider an algae reactor a good way to grow pods (its not a refugium)..
Its sole purpose is to quickly grow chaeto then throw a large mass of it out.. (thus potentially throwing out any pods frolicking in it.)

You would be better served doing something in the sump.. and yes.. just need light if you want to also grow macro algae there..
A refugium is supposed to be a place for "refuge" for smaller/weaker critters.. It doesn't need to also be a place where algae is grown/kept..
Even just some rock rubble without any light is basically a "refugium"..

RussC
09/13/2017, 07:35 AM
I got to looking at the Marinepure Ceramic Bio Media Plates. one plate is an incredible amount of surface area I could easily add to my sump. Had any experience with these? They also can house pods and I won't be tossing any out with the trash.

https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/marinepure-ceramic-biomedia-plate.html

mcgyvr
09/13/2017, 07:57 AM
"ceramic bioblocks" are basically the same as more live rock.. Just foamed ceramic vs natural rock..

Some have claimed elevated "aluminum" issues when using one brand..

RussC
09/13/2017, 08:13 AM
Wow, thanks for the heads up. A little gun shy now. Lots to read on this...

http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2453931&highlight=bio+block

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2506850

Would a reactor running GFO be a more certain phosphate control? And here I go again...the more I learn the more I get in trouble. But I'm assuming I'm increasing in phosphate levels because I'm beginning to see more algae. Gonna get a test, just haven't decided on a good Phosphate test. Been using Red Sea kits for other testing. Any suggestions on a good tester? What about the Checker?

mcgyvr
09/13/2017, 08:24 AM
GFO is a powerful way to reduce phosphate levels...
In 15+ years of reefing I've NEVER resorted to GFO..
I will NEVER recommend a newbie/new tank ever use it and there are very few reasons I would recommend anyone using it..
Its not the devil but its usually a bandaid to a problem that is better fixed other ways..

However..
Your tank is new.. Stop thinking about solving a problem you don't have..
Expect algae in a new tank. It will pass.. Its normal..
Algae in a new tank DOES NOT mean you will have a phosphate issue and to go out and get a GFO reactor running..

If we were friends/neighbors in life I feel like I'd have to slap sense into you on a daily basis..:p

"Dang it Russ.. there you go worrying again" ...SLAP..

RussC
09/13/2017, 08:30 AM
You would absolutely love me as your neighbor! LOL I'd be like the "cable guy."

I will say this, you are the only other person I ever met that is also referred to as McGyver. I'm always into something. Imagine that! I'm the guy that buys a tool and then goes and finds a reason I need the tool. I've got a heck of a lot of tools!

I do appreciate the help. And yes, I do need to be put in my place every now and again. I think that keeps life in perspective.

But I do need a phosphate test recommendation.

mcgyvr
09/13/2017, 08:37 AM
I use the red sea phosphate test kit currently..
But I will likely switch to salifert when it runs out.. I find it too hard to tell the difference between any of the colors on it.. But I'm always in the low range so I really don't care..
Its a test I only use when I think there might be an issue.. Phosphate never is for me..

I just switched my nitrate to salifert and am very happy with it..
I was using red sea then nyos in the past for nitrate and while the nyos wasn't bad at all I like the salifert just a little bit more..

mako61
09/13/2017, 08:38 AM
If we were friends/neighbors in life I feel like I'd have to slap sense into you on a daily basis..:p

"Dang it Russ.. there you go worrying again" ...SLAP..


lol now i have to clean coffee I just spit onto my keyboard...

RussC
09/13/2017, 08:46 AM
Thanks. Ill take a look at the salifert tests. Now, let me get back to learning more about this hobby so I can cause more trouble! It won't be long....I'll be on another tear.

mcgyvr
09/13/2017, 09:09 AM
I'll get my slap hand ready :)
Back to work for me..

ssky
09/13/2017, 09:11 AM
Not to hijack the thread but mcgyvr what did you recommend to manage phosphates. I have a tank 2 years old and having phosphates level of .25 ppm. Any idea?

Thanks

mcgyvr
09/13/2017, 09:17 AM
Not to hijack the thread but mcgyvr what did you recommend to manage phosphates. I have a tank 2 years old and having phosphates level of .25 ppm. Any idea?

Thanks

Let me ask this..what problems is it causing?
If nothing (usually elevated phosphates would cause algae issues).. then leave well enough alone.. Some tanks do amazing outside of the normally recommended "ranges"..

From what I've seen the majority of phosphate issues are due to overfeeding.. Stop that and phosphates aren't an issue..

Also.. what are your nitrate levels and do you keep corals or fish only?

ssky
09/13/2017, 11:09 AM
I have a 75 gallon tank with sump. I have 3 fish. goby, clown and gramma. I feed once a day small pinch of flakes. I do have some lps corals. I use RODI water and my phosphates are at 0.25. I am getting algae on my glass as well as on the rocks. It is minimal but I want to b prepared if I see getting out of control.It could be leaching from the rocks but I don't know. So in cases where there is no obvious reason what is a good strategy to try.

mcgyvr
09/13/2017, 11:20 AM
How old is your tank ssky?
What type of rock and where did you get it?
nitrate level?

Some algae is normal and expected and even more so in a new tank..
Switch to feeding every other day and see how that goes..

ssky
09/13/2017, 11:50 AM
My tank is a couple years old. Rocks I bought it from lfs it was live and I kept it live. I don't know how long he had it when I bought it but the rocks were fully purple. My nitrates are bit high too at 20 ppm.

mcgyvr
09/13/2017, 12:10 PM
ssky,
You might want to look into doing some carbon dosing then (vinegar is fine) provided you have a skimmer.. That should drop both nitrates and phosphates..
http://reefkeeping.com/joomla/index.php/current-issue/article/116-vinegar-dosing-methodology-for-the-marine-aquarium

ssky
09/13/2017, 12:51 PM
ssky,
You might want to look into doing some carbon dosing then (vinegar is fine) provided you have a skimmer.. That should drop both nitrates and phosphates..
http://reefkeeping.com/joomla/index.php/current-issue/article/116-vinegar-dosing-methodology-for-the-marine-aquariumThanks. I'll look into what carbon dosing is. Never done any dosing or additives etc.

Sent from my LGMS631 using Tapatalk

RussC
09/13/2017, 03:15 PM
Okay, so I'm exploring the local fish store looking for something I can use in my sump to increase surface area for bacteria and pods to grow since I'm now a little gun shy when it comes to the marine pure ceramic. I come across the crushed coral media used in calcium reactors. Why wouldn't that work? Its porous and natural. Pods could grow in that as well. But it is natural. Would it degrade over time? I realize it takes CO2 to dissolve it in a reactor. But if its just under water, would it really make any big deal and affect anything?

RussC
09/14/2017, 12:56 PM
What? Nothing? Not even a calm down, Russ, you worry too much (again).

mcgyvr
09/14/2017, 02:15 PM
What? Nothing? Not even a calm down, Russ, you worry too much (again).

Buy dry rock... use hammer... make rubble....