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jacksonpt
09/18/2017, 04:14 PM
If you had to rank various methods of filtration from "best" to "worst", what would your list look like? If you were setting up a new system, what would be your must haves and must dos for maintaining water quality?

The reason for my question is this: Seems like everything has a potential danger... anything in excess can cause problems. So what has the greatest benefit with the least risk?

I kept that vague/broad intentionally so people could go wherever they wanted to with the post/thread... but the umbrella over this conversation, I'm hoping, will be things we can do to keep our water quality high. Want to talk about dosing and water changes? Fine. Want to talk about reactor media? Go for it. Skimmers and UV sterilizers? Great.

Fredfish
09/18/2017, 04:37 PM
Best is the one I like. Worst is the one I don't like.

Seriously, there are many ways to maintain a tank that work equally well.

More important is your ability to observe your tank. Good observation is as important as basic testing tools in telling you when something is wrong with the tank.

jda
09/18/2017, 05:13 PM
1a) Lots of Real Live Rock from the Pacific Ocean
1b) 3 inches of mixed size aragonite sand

...everything else is next since 1a and 1b will do most of the work for you if done right.

der_wille_zur_macht
09/18/2017, 05:48 PM
I think we need to take a step back and understand the criteria applied in order to rank anything. What constitutes "best?"

Are you concerned about performance? If so, in what way? Nutrient removal? Organics removal? Processing of organics into inorganics? Reduction of organics? Something else?

What about price? Maintenance? DIY feasibility? Energy use? Compatibility with your overall sump or tank design?

heathlindner25
09/18/2017, 07:30 PM
Vodka

FullBoreReefer
09/18/2017, 08:03 PM
If you had to rank various methods of filtration from "best" to "worst", what would your list look like? If you were setting up a new system, what would be your must haves and must dos for maintaining water quality?

The reason for my question is this: Seems like everything has a potential danger... anything in excess can cause problems. So what has the greatest benefit with the least risk?

I kept that vague/broad intentionally so people could go wherever they wanted to with the post/thread... but the umbrella over this conversation, I'm hoping, will be things we can do to keep our water quality high. Want to talk about dosing and water changes? Fine. Want to talk about reactor media? Go for it. Skimmers and UV sterilizers? Great.

Worst- Nothing
Best- Something

jacksonpt
09/19/2017, 06:42 AM
I think we need to take a step back and understand the criteria applied in order to rank anything. What constitutes "best?"

Are you concerned about performance? If so, in what way? Nutrient removal? Organics removal? Processing of organics into inorganics? Reduction of organics? Something else?

What about price? Maintenance? DIY feasibility? Energy use? Compatibility with your overall sump or tank design?

It's subjective, and I left it that way intentionally. As previously mentioned, there are lots of ways to be successful in this hobby, and I didn't want to taint the discussion.

For me personally, with how I approach the hobby... keeping a system that is as close to self sufficient as possible is the key. Water changes are my single best method for keeping water quality high. Second... I'm not sure. Probably a healthy refugium, but I'm nto sure my 5g fuge is meaningful in the scope of my 50ish gal system. Good flow with plenty of liverock is definitely important.

Running GFO creates swings if I'm not overly proactive about changing it, so I have mixed feelings there, and I haven't run a skimmer in years.

ktownhero
09/19/2017, 07:33 AM
Best -- Lots of live rock, high flow, a chaeto fuge.

Worst -- Putting old cigarette filters in a canister and connecting the intake to an under gravel (sand) filter.

Wazzel
09/19/2017, 08:55 AM
The best system is the one that you buy into, fits your needs and you are able to keep up in both labor and cost.

The worst is anything you do halfway, neglect or unable to fund in both time and money.