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View Full Version : When is tank considered mature?


gareth.hubbarde
09/29/2017, 03:38 AM
Have been reading lots of posts and there are things that should only go into a mature tank. Things like clams, aneome etc and certain fish of course.
My tank has been up now for 6 months and I don't expect it to be mature yet. I have good soft corals in there with two stable lps corals. My inverts are doing well shrimps shed, snails and crabs all thriving. My fish are doing OK, my original blenny is awesome as is my goby with his shrimp buddy. Coralline algae is spreading onto all of the rocks now. I have had a few casualties along the way, clown fish exhibited strange behaviour by swimming on its side then died and fireball angel unexpectedly found as a shrimp food.
I am in no rush with my tank and am enjoying watching it grow and mature. Just wondering when it's classed as mature.
Thank you for your time.

94litre kent marine bio reef
17kg live rock
4kg sand, 2kg as live.
100g fluval clearmax
Filter floss
1000 l/pH return pump
100w heater
Hydor 3200 wave maker 2800 l/ph
Tmc aquabar t series leds:
Fiji purple 80%
Reef white 60%

1 Mexican turbo snail
1 turbo snails
3 red legged hermit crab
1 blue legged hermit
2 nassarius snails
2 super nassarius

1 lawnmower blenny
1 hi fin goby
1 Tiger pistol shrimp
1 red fire shrimp
1 skunk cleaner shrimp
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ssgss gogeta
09/29/2017, 04:04 AM
I don't think an exact this time say 1 year or something it is mature. I also don't like the exact term mature, the only thing I can think of that requires a "mature" tank would be mandarin gobies that require healthy pod population that come with time. I've had sps, clams and nems in tanks less than 2 months old successfully. I'd say a better term would be stablility or reached homeostasis. Meaning can you constantly keep your salinity, ph, alk, calc, mag, nitrates, phosphates stable. The other point is the learning curve mature is often used to say if this is your first salt water tank have you had the tank long enough to understand it better and less likely to make rookie mistakes.


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gareth.hubbarde
09/29/2017, 07:13 AM
I don't think an exact this time say 1 year or something it is mature. I also don't like the exact term mature, the only thing I can think of that requires a "mature" tank would be mandarin gobies that require healthy pod population that come with time. I've had sps, clams and nems in tanks less than 2 months old successfully. I'd say a better term would be stablility or reached homeostasis. Meaning can you constantly keep your salinity, ph, alk, calc, mag, nitrates, phosphates stable. The other point is the learning curve mature is often used to say if this is your first salt water tank have you had the tank long enough to understand it better and less likely to make rookie mistakes.


Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkThank you for your reply. I really appreciate the feedback. At 6 months I understand that things take time there is no quick way to do things. I'm saving for a clam, that's my next investment. Will monitor calc level once added. At the moment with just 2 lps it's stable at 450 (the level in my salt).
Thanks again.

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jda
09/29/2017, 09:20 AM
Biologically, when the tank can turn NO3 into N gas and your nitrates stay pretty low without you do anything. Cirtter-wise, when pods, sponges and coralline are everywhere.

Nothing is impossible before this, but it sure is a lot easier afterward.

ReeferNoob4ever
09/29/2017, 10:50 AM
jda is correct. The time it takes to do this varies greatly. It really depends on your live rock. I put stinky wet nasty live rock in my tanks for the cycle and I have noticed nitrate reduction without water changes during the cycle before. Just remember that if your tank isn't 'mature' in most cases this just means you will have to stay on top of nitrate reduction manually and you may need to spot feed certain creatures that rely more on an established tank to get their nourishment.

mcgyvr
09/29/2017, 11:13 AM
I personally have noticed that what they are talking happens around the 8-10 month mark or so.. I always start with dry rock/dry sand and its always about that time when tanks just get "easier" to maintain..

billdogg
09/30/2017, 10:44 AM
As others have said, it takes at least 6-10 months, but even then it will continue to evolve. Most of the rocks in my 120DT are going on 30 years old now, and I still find new/different things all the time. That, at least to me, is one of the things that makes this hobby so continually fascinating.