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Green Lantern
01/29/2000, 02:43 PM
Hi

I just purchased a Caulastrea furcata and a few of the branches are damaged. Some of the septa are poking through the tissue. My question is can they recover or are those branches dead or dying? Another question I have is that in TRA vol.1 they say that it requires lots of light with low flow. In Sprung's new book it has from low light to high light and low flow to high flow as exceptable ranges. Does anyone have some experience with placement of this species? I have it at the top of my tank under high flow at the moment.

Troy

Still Reefs
01/29/2000, 02:53 PM
Hey Troy,

You will find that Caulastrea sp. will recover quickly in well established systems. The one colony that I have in my 29 gallon tank was taken out of a microreef in the store I work in due to ailing health. I have kept this colony under all Normal Output(NO), partily NO with Very High Output(VHO) and finally under VHO and 250w Metal Halide bulbs. It has done GREAT and asexual reproduction is on the rise. I have also kept it in a calm laminar current as well as a violent thrashing one.

Hope this helps!!

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Sean Bradley
Photographer : Still Reefs Photographic Productions (http://stillherps.herpexchange.com/stillreefs
)

JohnL
01/29/2000, 02:54 PM
Hi Troy,

I have two Caulastrea and both of them are doing well. They are midway in the tank about 12" from the lights (4x96 PC) in fairly low flow areas.

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Peace - John

Green Lantern
01/29/2000, 03:40 PM
Thanks Sean and John.

Troy

Reef Junkie
01/29/2000, 08:52 PM
Troy,
I have a colony of Caulastrea that went from the brink of death to full recovery. The polyps were hanging off of the skeleton and there was hair algae growing on the bared skeleton. It took about 2 years, but the whole colony is reattached and growing. They do great when they aren't damaged, but take some time for a damaged colony to heal. My colony was an extreme case. Sean, how long did it take for your colony to recover? I also agree with him on specifications on placement. They can be fickle, but most of all try not to move the colony too much. Stability is key to their recovery. Once you've found a good spot for them leave them there. I keep them about 2' directly under a 400watt MH bulb. Now I just need to find a way to get the Aiptasia out from between the polyps... :rolleyes:
Later,
Bill


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http://www.homestead.com/reefjunkie/highenergy.html

Still Reefs
01/29/2000, 10:54 PM
Hey Bill,

I don't remember exactly how long it took for my Caulastrea colony to heal, I think it only took about 3 months. I suspect its damage was due to excessive heat, the colony was in a Marineland Eclipse 6 with 13w power compact lighting which partly caused the water to reach about 90F one day. The skeleton was exposed and you couldn't see polyp flesh in the "star" but about a month later the flesh just popped out and a few months after that the whole polyps were recovered. This colony is small and I usually don't put LPS corals in my tank but I can't stand to see stuff die and I have really grown to love the little corals. You can see pics of my small colony on my website. Also, Bill have you tried injecting the Aiptasia? If not, take a tuberculin syringe and small needle, draw up a heavy Kalkwasser solution and inject it into the aiptasia. That will melt em away!

Hope that helps!

LATER!

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Sean Bradley
Photographer : Still Reefs Photographic Productions (http://stillherps.herpexchange.com/stillreefs
)

Green Lantern
01/30/2000, 01:32 AM
Earlier this evening I noticed a little hitch-hiker on the Caulastrea, there are two tiny stems of what appears to be Xenia sp. Normally I wouldn't object to free stuff :) but the way xenia grows could be a pain. Anyway thanks for the advice, the coral is looking good and after both of your stories I am much more optimistic. Good luck on the aiptasia. Curiousity thing here Bill, you've probably done all the standard things to get rid of the problem do they just keep coming back?

Troy

Nemo
01/30/2000, 09:21 AM
Reef Junkie,
Try using a small drop of superglue gel over the retracted Aiptasia polyp to seal it into the rock. This method has worked great for me when they are is close quarters with a coral I don't wish to harm.
Nemo

Reef Junkie
01/30/2000, 08:09 PM
Sean,
I've tried using the Kalkwasser, but they keep coming back. Injected or given orally they seem to just survive and divide. I'm probably doing something wrong!? I have an Aiptasia eating Copperband, but my Sailfin Tang won't let him in the main reef. He tried killing him the last time I put the two together.
Troy,
They keep coming back and they're on the brink of hitting plague proportions! I have to get the Sailfin out and the Copperband in.
Also, don't worry about the Xenia. The Caulastrea won't let the Xenia overgrow them.
Nemo,
That's a clever idea and I've used it before on Hydroid colonies with great success. It's just that the Aiptasia is in hard to get places and too close for comfort next to living corals. Clumsy me, I'd glue the polyps shut on my Caulastrea! :rolleyes:
Hopefully I'll find a soloution to my problem without tearing all the rock out!
LAter,
Bill

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http://www.homestead.com/reefjunkie/highenergy.html

JohnL
01/30/2000, 10:13 PM
Just thought I would mention that TRA vol 1 talks about a boring sponge that is sometimes found on Caulastrea sp.

My C. curvata had one of these sponges on it. Since I removed the sponge, the branch that it was on is doing much better.

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Peace - John

Green Lantern
01/30/2000, 10:55 PM
Caulastrea sp. has been in my tank for more
than 24hrs. It has yet to fully open. I
know this isn't much time but I wonder if it has to do with the waterflow. I have him just below and 36" away from the output of my external pump, a Little Giant 2MDQX.

Again I point out that there are some conflicting points in TRA vol. 1 and Corals-A Quick Reference Guide. The TRA says lots of light and low flow while the chart in Corals says low to high light and current.

I don't really want to put the Caulastrea sp. on the other side of my tank where there is a little less flow because of possible aggression problems. I have a plerogyra sinuosa and euphyllia divisa up there now.
What do ya think?

Troy

Reef Junkie
01/31/2000, 05:13 AM
Troy,
What type of lighting are you using? I think the best placement would be under full light, but not too close to the stronger type bulbs, like metal halide. Just in full light and in moderate current. Try keeping it in a current that isn't too strong. Something that doesn't cause the polyp to move or cave in.
Later,
Bill

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http://www.homestead.com/reefjunkie/highenergy.html

Green Lantern
01/31/2000, 09:28 AM
I'm using an icecap 660 4x110 VHO lighting. I'll move the coral into less turbulent waters. Thanks again Bill. John, I looked for the sponges you mentioned and didn't see any abnormalities on any branches. Exactly what did the sponges you had look like?

Troy

Reef Junkie
01/31/2000, 11:54 PM
Troy,
I forgot to mention one key reasons my Caulastrea recovered. You have to take some time and really look at the coral. Then, when no one is looking, start using some baby talk on it. Start slowy with a few goo-goo's and gaa-gaa's. Then, as your relationship grows and it masters the language better, try using more complex words like, boobaroobabankbankb. That one always gets my Caulastrea growing!
Later, :rolleyes:
Bill
PS Remember to make sure no one is looking or in earshot when you do this. That's also key!

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http://www.homestead.com/reefjunkie/highenergy.html