PDA

View Full Version : question on vinegar treatment


bboy aqua
03/04/2006, 07:57 PM
My Ph is at 8.6+ and it wont go down
I know the problem was because of my cement rock i added and just recently removed
I want to dose vinegar but dont know how
What type of vinegar do i need to use?
How much do I dose?
How often?
With livestock in the tank or without?

bertoni
03/04/2006, 09:12 PM
Vinegar will lower the pH temporarily. It's important to be sure that the pH measurement is correct. In a 10g nano, I would start with maybe 1/8 tsp of white distilled vinegar, and see what happens. Water changes are much safer, IMO.

bertoni
03/04/2006, 09:15 PM
http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=792216

Link to one NTTH thread on this tank.

Randy Holmes-Farley
03/05/2006, 06:14 AM
If you have big ongoing neeeds to reduce pH due to artificial rock, vinegar may not be quite as good of a choice as soda water becaused the vinegar will reduce O2 and drive bacterial growth.

I discuss dosing both soda water and vinegar, and give doses, in this article:

High pH: Causes and Cures
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2005-03/rhf/index.htm


from it:

Solutions to pH Problems

Some solutions to pH problems are peculiar to a specific cause, such as adding vinegar to limewater, or using less of it. Some general solutions, however, are frequently effective. My recommendations on how to deal with high pH problems are detailed below.

The most benign way to reduce high pH is to aerate the water more. Whether the aquarium looks well-aerated or not, if the pH is above 8.5 and the alkalinity is not above 4 meq/L, then the aquarium is not fully equilibrated with carbon dioxide in the air. Equilibrating carbon dioxide can be much more difficult than equilibrating oxygen. Air contains very little carbon dioxide (about 350 ppm) relative to oxygen (210,000 ppm). Consequently, a lot more air needs to be driven through the water to introduce the same amount of carbon dioxide as oxygen. Perfect aeration will solve nearly any high pH problem, and will rarely cause any problem of its own.

That said, sufficient aeration is not always easily attained, and other methods can be useful. These other methods are:

A. Direct addition of carbon dioxide. Bottled soda water (seltzer) can be used to instantly reduce aquarium pH. Be sure to select unflavored soda water, and check the ingredients to be sure it doesn't contain anything that should be avoided (phosphate, etc). Many manufacturers list water and carbon dioxide as the only ingredients.

I recommend adding 6 mL of soda water per gallon of tank water to reduce pH by about 0.3 units. Add it to a high flow area away from organisms (such as in a sump). The local pH where it first is added will be very low. Going about this procedure slowly is better than proceeding too fast. If you do not have a sump, add it especially slowly. Some soda water may have more, or less, carbon dioxide in it, and the lower the aquarium's alkalinity, the larger will be the pH drop. Also, the higher the pH, the smaller will be the pH drop, because the buffering of seawater declines steadily as the pH drops from about 9 to 7.5.

B. Direct addition of vinegar. Commercial distilled white vinegar (typically 5% acetic acid or "5% acidity") can be used to instantly reduce aquarium pH. Do not use wine vinegars as they may contain undesirable organics in addition to the acetic acid.

I recommend adding 1 mL of distilled white vinegar per gallon of tank water to initially reduce pH by about 0.3 units. Once again, add it to a high flow area away from organisms (such as in a sump). The local pH where it first is added will be very low. Going about this procedure slowly is better than proceeding too fast. If you do not have a sump, add it especially slowly. The lower the aquarium's alkalinity, the larger will be the pH drop. Also, the higher the pH, the smaller will be the pH drop, because the buffering of seawater declines steadily as the pH drops from about 9 to 7.5. Remember, there may be an additional, later drop in pH as the vinegar is metabolized to carbon dioxide.

C. Addition of vinegar via limewater. Commercial distilled white vinegar can be used to reduce tank pH by adding it to limewater that is subsequently added to the aquarium. Do not use wine vinegars as they may contain undesirable organics in addition to the acetic acid. A reasonable dose to start with is 45 ml of vinegar per gallon of limewater.

bboy aqua
03/05/2006, 08:45 PM
should I dose with the livestock inside or remove them?

TwistedTiger
03/05/2006, 09:10 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=6889597#post6889597 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by bboy aqua
should I dose with the livestock inside or remove them?

As long as you don't drop the PH too quick your tank mates will be just fine.

Randy Holmes-Farley
03/06/2006, 05:21 AM
:thumbsup:

You can dose with the livestock still there. :)