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seaduck
10/05/2006, 10:38 AM
I put a tablespoon of buffer to a gal of fresh saltwater and added it to my 30 gal nano. Some of the creatures are acting a lil funny, not opening up all the way etc. Did i add too much? lfs said i was low on buffer and to follow dirs on container. Directions say 1 teaspoon to 20 or 30 gals so i added too much. Im gonna do a water change today to see if everyone goes back to normal. Gonna buy test kits today too so i can measure it myself.

Steven Pro
10/05/2006, 10:50 AM
Yes, too much buffer can be bad. I believe 1 tablespoon is like 3 or 4 teaspoons, so you over did it.

seaduck
10/05/2006, 11:18 AM
ok, thx...i wasnt paying attention to details and added a tablespoon...hope the h20 change fixes it...

Miasma_F
10/05/2006, 11:51 AM
Make sure you check your calcium levels. A while back I was continually adding buffer trying to bring up my PH. At the time I wasn't testing alk and calcium.

Things got very bad. When I finally tested, alk was through the roof and calcium was only around 200.

I had a complete coraline die of, and lost all but 3 pollups on my softball sized trumpet.

DrBegalke
10/05/2006, 12:27 PM
Yes, it can be bad. There is a a forum devoted to reef chemistry here:

http://reefcentral.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?s=&forumid=112

Billybeau1
10/05/2006, 01:15 PM
Yes, ph buffers are not generally a good way to maintain pH. The raising affect is short term and your alk is probably extremely high. It will fall on its own but a water change is a good idea.

fsn77
10/05/2006, 01:24 PM
1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons

So, you surely overdid it. Good luck -- hope the water change helps.

seaduck
10/05/2006, 02:56 PM
Well, being stupid has its drawbacks. The tank was a lil stressed yesterday after the overdose. I hope the h20 change puts thinks back to normal....So, BillyBeau1, how can i maintain proper ph naturally w/o dosing buffer???

Billybeau1
10/05/2006, 03:01 PM
Low pH is almost always excessive CO2 in the home.

More aeration with fresher air and limewater are fine ways to go.

Give this a read when you get time

Low pH: Causes and Cures
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2004-09/rhf/index.htm

and

What your grandmother never told you about lime
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2005-01/rhf/index.htm

seaduck
10/05/2006, 04:09 PM
great..thx a lot...sd

ReefEze
10/05/2006, 05:14 PM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8282680#post8282680 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by Billybeau1
Yes, ph buffers are not generally a good way to maintain pH. The raising affect is short term and your alk is probably extremely high. It will fall on its own but a water change is a good idea.

ditto that

kpcollins31
10/05/2006, 07:35 PM
Low pH: Causes and Cures
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2004-09/rhf/index.htm

Good article - I used to always have a pH ~7.8. After reading the article, I started dosing Kalkwasser to balance calcium and alkalinity while also removing CO2 from the water to raise pH. It has worked very well - pH now maintained at ~8.4 and it is very simple to do. There has been a positive change in all my corals.

Kevin