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BBoley24
10/23/2006, 10:57 AM
I need some help... and fast...

I currently have the Oceanic 140G RR. It has dual overflows on each side of the tank. I am using the stock plumbing that came with the tank. I ended up plumbing my returns in 1 1/4 inch returns... I have a mag 9.5 on one side and a mag 12 on the other. The overflows obviously cant handle the return flow rate... How big of a bulkhead can I go on this Oceanic tank? And more importantly... Where can I get them? If you tell me I can get it at Home Depot Im there in an instant... just tell me what they are called and how big! I figured it would have to 1 1/4 to match the return flow... HELP!

Whaledriver
10/23/2006, 11:20 AM
Contact Oceanic about the hole size of the tank and find out if its tempered glass. The big hole is supposed to be the drain. Some companies make bulkheads that will fit better than others. Another risky trick is to bore out the drain bulkhead to make it flow more.

Why so much flow to the sump? Have you considered something like a closed loop or Tunze streams?

One way to use your current pump set up, improve flow and still handle the flow rate is to add a SQWD to the return. The back pressure on the pumps will reduce to flow rate but improve overall water movement in the tank.

Why not trade both pumps in for a Mag18? You reduce your plumbing problems and lower electricity usage.

BBoley24
10/23/2006, 11:39 AM
Well I was trying to max my flow that the tank could handle. And without the correct bulkhead size I can't do that. I don't like mechanical devices in my tank so no powerheads... (Asthetics) On the other hand getting the one pump is a good idea. But then again I could hook the Mag12 up to the SQWD and slow it down a bit. Either which way I need to max out my bulkhead fitting size. Im just not sure what the stock size is on this tank. Can you get a bulkhead from Home Depot?

Whaledriver
10/23/2006, 05:18 PM
Most Oceanic tanks I have dealt with have a 1 inch and a 3/4 inch bulkhead in each overflow.
The only place you can find a bulkhead is online or a local pet shop.
A closed loop would be uncluttered and keep the flow through the sump down. You want to do this for a lot of reasons but basically the only thing that needs to go through the sump is the water for the skimmer.

One option is to run the Mag 9 as the return for the sump and the Mag 12 as a closed loop with a SWID. The nice thing about a closed loop is that you can have more flow without fighting the overflows and gravity on the return water. A second benefit is that the water going to the skimmer ends up with a more concentrated amount of pollution. The top surface film of the water has the most pollution.

BBoley24
10/23/2006, 05:51 PM
wow.... I was totally think about doing that... but how would I hook that up with only 4 holes?

rxinc
10/23/2006, 09:56 PM
Where can I get them?

I have an Oceanic 225 rr tank that I custom ordered oversized drains (to 1.5")

It came with heavy duty schedule 80 bulkheads for the drains - like these which I have ordered for my sump

http://savko.com/partlist.asp?pgid=2&ptid=5&pid=27&part=105007

BUT light weight bulkheads for the returns... like these

http://www.premiumaquatics.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=BH07B&Category_Code=Bulkheads

I have a 55 gal Oceanic tank that I bought used and the holes will only accept the lighter weight bulkheads in both drain and return holes.

Whaledriver
10/24/2006, 10:10 AM
One way to do a closed loop is to have the pipes hang over the edge, kind of like a canister filter is plumbed.
I would have a one intake hang over the edge to the pump and then two returns that split after a SWID. If you put the returns far apart you will get a nice pulse or swirl from the SWID. There is a increased risk of leaks with any closed loop but I wouldnt worry.

rxinc
I would do the schedule 40 bulkheads on the drain since they wont restrict the flow as much and they are not under a lot of stress or pressure. Once installed and not messed with or touched bulkheads seldom leak if installed right.

I have read of people using silicone aquarium sealer instead of oil on the bulkhead gasket with great success to prevent failure. I use it instead of Teflon tape on all my fittings.

AndyNarwhal
10/24/2006, 10:48 PM
Stock Oceanic tanks are plumbed with 2 x 1.75" holes for 1" bulkheads. The return is a 1" bulkhead with a molded 3/4" hose barb for tubing connection. The drain is a 1" bulkhead with a molded hosebarb that's between 1" and 1.25" in size. Unless your tank was custom made the overflow is the Megaflow design used by AGA as well and the bulkhead is not the limiting factor in the water flow but the size and number of slots at the top of the box. There are 23 functioning slots in the Megaflow and it limits the water flow to 600 gph maximum. However in shorter tanks it is possible to drain as much as 800 gph through them. Don't ask me how. Increasing the hole diameter will not allow you to drain more water. Your best bet would be to use a closed loop that's independent of the overflows to increase water movement.
Also using silicone sealant on the bulkhead gasket will not prevent leaks. When you tighten the bulkhead nut all the silicone is going to squoosh out from under the gasket anyways. You may have some secondary effect from the silicone squirting into the hole filling the gap between bulkhead and tank but I wouldn't trust that as a seal.

Whaledriver
10/25/2006, 09:45 AM
I have read a few people having the oil on the gasket slowly erode and I don't think that will happen with silicone since it is inert.

pjf
11/23/2006, 10:09 AM
<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8410476#post8410476 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by AndyNarwhal
Stock Oceanic tanks are plumbed with 2 x 1.75" holes for 1" bulkheads. The return is a 1" bulkhead with a molded 3/4" hose barb for tubing connection. The drain is a 1" bulkhead with a molded hosebarb that's between 1" and 1.25" in size. Unless your tank was custom made the overflow is the Megaflow design used by AGA as well and the bulkhead is not the limiting factor in the water flow but the size and number of slots at the top of the box. There are 23 functioning slots in the Megaflow and it limits the water flow to 600 gph maximum. However in shorter tanks it is possible to drain as much as 800 gph through them. Don't ask me how.
I agree that the 23 slots of my Megaflow do limit water drainage but will you please tell us where these 600 gph and 800 gph figures come from and how the height of the tank determines the flow rate limit?

My stock 75-gallon Oceanic "Reef Ready" tank is among the shortest Megaflow tanks at 21" height. The tempered glass bottom came with a 1.75" drain hole and a 1.5" return hole. The supplied barb connectors have 3/4" and 9/16” internal diameters that constrict the flow even more. To increase the drain diameter to 1-1/8" (narrowest portion of supplied drain pipe base), I replaced the supplied hose barb with a 1-1/4” hose fitting assembly that compresses to the exterior of the supplied bulkhead. To increase the return diameter, I fashioned my own bulkhead with a threaded 1” PVC nib and two female barrel couplings. Additional modifications, such as a manifold "Y" leading to two return nozzles, ensure that there are no constrictions in the flow beyond the ¾” ID of my Iwaki MD30-RXT pump outlet. I believe that my water flow is at least 800 gph based on the head loss calculator. The flow is certainly at the limit since the tank water level touches the top of the Megaflow slots and the bottom of my glass brace. (No return valve and no flooding yet.)

xtrstangx
11/23/2006, 11:18 AM
pjf: 600 GPH is how much a 1" bulkhead can drain from gravity. Sometimes they will do more, but 600 GPH is a good starting figure.

IBASSFSH
11/23/2006, 12:22 PM
You can widen the space between the overflow teeth some with a razor knife or a dremel tool. This some times helps. I would restrict the flow coming into the tank some with a ball valve. If you still desire more flow then add some pwerheads or a over the edge closed loop system.

TheFlyingTang
11/23/2006, 09:08 PM
Here is what I have done on my 155.

1. Cut out the slots on the skimmer boxes and use eggcrate for a guard.

2. Use both Bulkhead fittings in each skimmer box as drains to the sump. Each has its own ball valve to control flow and eliminate air getting sucked into the sump, thereby eliminating micro bubbles in the tank.

3. I the skimmer box I added another home made duroso.

4. I have installed 2 Sea Swirl oscillating returns. These use only 5 watts of power each.

5. eliminate all the PVC piping, 90's, 45's, etc. and went to PV tubing to eliminate resistance.

Now my dual Gen X's can flow 1150 gph each into the tank with no microbubbles. No need to increase the electric bill by adding more pumps into the tank. Micro bubbles gone.

Next tank I will custom order the biggest diameter holes and larger skimmer boxes.

Considering what I have to work with its not a bad set-up.

fishytoo123
11/26/2006, 06:26 PM
Make sure your drain lines don't droop down. They need to flow straight to the sump or pump. You will find that makes a big difference.


<a href=showthread.php?s=&postid=8397613#post8397613 target=_blank>Originally posted</a> by BBoley24
I need some help... and fast...

I currently have the Oceanic 140G RR. It has dual overflows on each side of the tank. I am using the stock plumbing that came with the tank. I ended up plumbing my returns in 1 1/4 inch returns... I have a mag 9.5 on one side and a mag 12 on the other. The overflows obviously cant handle the return flow rate... How big of a bulkhead can I go on this Oceanic tank? And more importantly... Where can I get them? If you tell me I can get it at Home Depot Im there in an instant... just tell me what they are called and how big! I figured it would have to 1 1/4 to match the return flow... HELP!

IBASSFSH
11/26/2006, 07:13 PM
They should also not be below the water line as it traps air, and reduces the drainage speed.