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Old 03/23/2012, 01:32 PM   #54
gmate
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Littleton, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DLANDINO View Post
Thanks for all of this advice Paul! So, the nails that I see by the 1000's on the beach now and throughout summer, can you add these to our reef relatively safely? I know they are cold water animals but then I see them happy as...well...snails in the boiling tidal pools in the mid summer months. Wondering if they can have longevity and acclimate to our tanks long term. I assume that they are omnivorous as I think I see them on dead clams and crabs as well as on seaweed.
I've put 30 or 40 in my tank so far and they're all doing very well. Unlike other snails they tend to stay in the sandbed and don't really climb the live rock. But they go all over the glass and I haven't used a scraper since their introduction. I've also seen a decrease in Cyano. They are very slow and my hermits do pick on them. Paul has the expert answer I'm sure, but so far my inclination is yes you can use them. I didn't do too much acclimation, and it took them a day to really start moving around. They are far more active at night. The bigger snails (Periwinkle) move over the live rock but the little guys don't.

If I could make a suggestion, get more Periwinkles than the small ones - they seem more active and tend to be bigger. Paul, do you know what species the smaller mud snails are? They look like Coffee Bean snails but they're definitely not Nassarius (though there are Nassarius species that I've encountered on the short, just not as common).

EDIT: Answered my own question with some google'ing.

Ilyanassa Obsoletus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilyanassa_obsoleta




http://www.manhattanreefs.com/forum/...nd-snails.html

Apparently mud snails do really well, but Periwinkles do not. So definitely grab the smaller mud snails!



Last edited by gmate; 03/23/2012 at 01:40 PM.
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