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Old 03/30/2017, 07:02 PM   #4198
taricha
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NE Miss
Posts: 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by mandrieu View Post
So, you're saying iron concentration is a limiting factor for dinos? Are there other known limiting factors you are aware of?
Sorry. This got long.
DNA demonstrated using low Alk to halt dinos. (And everything else) There are lots of limiting factors: B12 (other vitamins?), iron, other trace metals, N, P, alk, light...
Problem is finding something that dinos need that they can be deprived of, and outcompeted for on an ongoing basis in a reef setting.
Alk, N, P, light are problematic either because dinos are just as good as our other tank inhabitants at uptake of scarce amounts of these, or they can wait out low levels seemingly forever, or we just can't let our tanks stay low for long enough to hurt dinos.

Here's things people do that they report re-invigorate a stalled dino bloom. Indicates dinos probably ran out of something, but grew when it was available again: and what might have been provided...
Water changes: iron, trace metals.
Aminos, Fuel, coral frenzy, etc: vitamins, B12, trace metals.
Sea veggies seaweed: lotsa iron, trace metals, vitamins
GFO: iron, though barely any soluble.

Cyano also makes B12, captures N and maybe iron - so its cozy association with dinos might be more about scarce resources than coincidence.
I've hunted through bunches of triton reports of people's salt mix when they said water changes caused dino re-bloom, and there is no common element, so it is probably something where biologically useful amounts are below the triton detection limits. iron fits that description, but so might other trace metals.
Also B12 is made around cobalt, so there's some overlap in the vitamin/trace metal labeling.

Macroalgae has iron, trace metals, vitamins etc. It needs them, and seems to be good at getting them. It's quite possible that this competition for trace elements/vitamins is the other factor (predation being big also) that keeps an algae heavy tank away from dino infestation.
In my tank I grew tons of macro - chaeto & caulerpa - and amphidinium dinos disappeared. I threw in some trace elements with iron and dinos made a modest recovery.
It would be instructive to look at published growth media that scientists use to culture our specific dino species. might be able to eliminate some candidates that way.

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