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Old 10/04/2017, 05:43 PM   #201
bertoni
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I'd start looking for other problems. You could consider adding one new coral, to see how it does, but most corals should have recovered by now, I'd think. Could you post a picture of the tank?


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Old 10/04/2017, 06:08 PM   #202
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I'd start looking for other problems. You could consider adding one new coral, to see how it does, but most corals should have recovered by now, I'd think. Could you post a picture of the tank?
Here:














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Old 10/04/2017, 06:10 PM   #203
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I have a lot of those sponges from the last image


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Old 10/05/2017, 01:42 PM   #204
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I would start looking around for other issues in the tank. I suspect that those corals would be doing better if conditions were favorable, but I might be incorrect. Adding a new coral might be informative.


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Old 03/28/2018, 08:18 PM   #205
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update?


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Old 03/29/2018, 07:41 AM   #206
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I lost 95% of my corals, still don't know what was wrong. I don't dose anything anymore just WC since I don't have many corals. Going to try and buy some new corals and see how it goes.


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Old 03/29/2018, 08:55 AM   #207
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I noticed your idodine was 0 in your triton test, that might also be a problem?
As far as LPS goes I think having detectable nitrate/phosphate is most important, as well as light alternating flow.


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Old 03/29/2018, 10:29 PM   #208
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There's not much evidence that iodine is useful:

https://www.advancedaquarist.com/2003/3/chemistry

A lot of people, including me, have stopped dosing iodine and not noticed any difference.


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Old 04/02/2018, 02:09 PM   #209
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Originally Posted by Staisman View Post
I lost 95% of my corals, still don't know what was wrong. I don't dose anything anymore just WC since I don't have many corals. Going to try and buy some new corals and see how it goes.
I have read the whole thread and it seems like a complete dead end... For I case like this, I would consider a disease as the culprit more than water chemistry. A disease that is perhaps bacterial or viral (or some other types of pathogen).

There are few signs here that may indicate some type of pathogen.

First all started with carbon dosing, carbon dosing increases the populations of wide variety of organisms. Carbon dosing might have caused the population of a certain bacteria to explode. Many bacteria can turn pathogenic if their numbers are very high. For instance, E.coli is a common beneficial gut bacteria in humans (or mammals), but if its population explode for some reason, it can kill you.

Some other signs;

STN in SPS from bottom up. A similar bacteria induced white band disease in SPS corals is bacterial and cause bottom of tissue necrosis. Here is a small description from wikipedia on white band disease;

The disease, however, typically begins from the base of the coral and works its way up the coral branches.[1] As it progresses, the band leaves behind the white coral skeleton.[4] Many of the details of how the breakdown of coral occurs due to the bacteria are unclear mainly in part to the difficulty in isolating marine bacteria.[8] Studies have confirmed that white band disease is contagious and caused by a pathogenic bacteria.[8] Experiments have shown that Ampicillin may be able to treat white band disease type I.

The way how your LPS corals die is also similar to bacterial infection. You described a clear mat growing on the skeleton as skeleton turns black and tissue recedes. That might very well be the pathogen or more bacteria being attracted to the dying tissue as pathogen makes it way. I had euphyllia specific bacterial infection that killed all my euphyllia corals in about a month. All died similar to the way you described, their tissue receded until it reached to the polyp head and after that they just started to disintegrate. I dipped some corals in antibiotic solutions for overnight, they also looked better for several days but the disease returned in few days later. I was very much convinced it was bacterial. It killed all my euphyllia corals, but nothing else died.

In your case you might have a pathogen that is less host specific and able to infect large variety of corals. Maybe carbon dosing caused the initial population explosion and infected corals are just cant get rid of it and are slowly dying.


You might try to use some methods that reduce bacteria population. Simplest way is UV, but it wont do anything to potential pathogens that are already on the corals. You might try ozone, it can kill at least some of the potential pathogens on corals or at least stress them and give corals a fighting chance.

If you are desperate, you can try adding antibiotics to the water or add diluted amounts of hydrogen peroxide. But as you might imagine these will have consequences on overall healthy of your tank, mainly inters of bio filter.

Another options if to dip corals with antibiotic. When I dipped my corals in antibiotic (mix penicillin and kanamycin) overnight there was a clear recovery for a short period until symptoms returned. It didnt save my corals, but helped me to narrow down the issue to bacterial infection. If your corals also look at least partially better after antibiotic dipping, it might indicate a bacterial pathogen.



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Old 04/06/2018, 02:43 PM   #210
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Originally Posted by Tripod1404 View Post
I have read the whole thread and it seems like a complete dead end... For I case like this, I would consider a disease as the culprit more than water chemistry. A disease that is perhaps bacterial or viral (or some other types of pathogen).

There are few signs here that may indicate some type of pathogen.

First all started with carbon dosing, carbon dosing increases the populations of wide variety of organisms. Carbon dosing might have caused the population of a certain bacteria to explode. Many bacteria can turn pathogenic if their numbers are very high. For instance, E.coli is a common beneficial gut bacteria in humans (or mammals), but if its population explode for some reason, it can kill you.

Some other signs;

STN in SPS from bottom up. A similar bacteria induced white band disease in SPS corals is bacterial and cause bottom of tissue necrosis. Here is a small description from wikipedia on white band disease;

The disease, however, typically begins from the base of the coral and works its way up the coral branches.[1] As it progresses, the band leaves behind the white coral skeleton.[4] Many of the details of how the breakdown of coral occurs due to the bacteria are unclear mainly in part to the difficulty in isolating marine bacteria.[8] Studies have confirmed that white band disease is contagious and caused by a pathogenic bacteria.[8] Experiments have shown that Ampicillin may be able to treat white band disease type I.

The way how your LPS corals die is also similar to bacterial infection. You described a clear mat growing on the skeleton as skeleton turns black and tissue recedes. That might very well be the pathogen or more bacteria being attracted to the dying tissue as pathogen makes it way. I had euphyllia specific bacterial infection that killed all my euphyllia corals in about a month. All died similar to the way you described, their tissue receded until it reached to the polyp head and after that they just started to disintegrate. I dipped some corals in antibiotic solutions for overnight, they also looked better for several days but the disease returned in few days later. I was very much convinced it was bacterial. It killed all my euphyllia corals, but nothing else died.

In your case you might have a pathogen that is less host specific and able to infect large variety of corals. Maybe carbon dosing caused the initial population explosion and infected corals are just cant get rid of it and are slowly dying.


You might try to use some methods that reduce bacteria population. Simplest way is UV, but it wont do anything to potential pathogens that are already on the corals. You might try ozone, it can kill at least some of the potential pathogens on corals or at least stress them and give corals a fighting chance.

If you are desperate, you can try adding antibiotics to the water or add diluted amounts of hydrogen peroxide. But as you might imagine these will have consequences on overall healthy of your tank, mainly inters of bio filter.

Another options if to dip corals with antibiotic. When I dipped my corals in antibiotic (mix penicillin and kanamycin) overnight there was a clear recovery for a short period until symptoms returned. It didnt save my corals, but helped me to narrow down the issue to bacterial infection. If your corals also look at least partially better after antibiotic dipping, it might indicate a bacterial pathogen.
Very interesting, I also think it's bacterial. Couple of my fish died also with bacterial infection signs. Few corals that left are not dying anymore but also not growing. After two years i am finally getting some signs of recovery. I will post some pictures.

I did not add any new corals, I want to be sure my tank is save first. My GSP coral turned from brown to green again but not growing, used to grow like crazy every day. My ricorderia mushrooms are not expending and not growing either. The same time my Uma's spliting and growing as usual, my two RBA are growing and doing very good. That's all I have left.


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Old 04/19/2018, 05:53 PM   #211
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I ran hydrogen peroxide for a week 15 ml a day with no noticeable effects My candycain keep dying.


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Old 04/23/2018, 10:51 AM   #212
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How old are the lights? Test for mag, and run gfo and carbon.


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Old 04/23/2018, 10:56 AM   #213
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How old are the lights? Test for mag, and run gfo and carbon.
I am using mostly LEDs right now since I have no SPS left I don't see the point running T5. I have my carbon running all the time. No reason for GFO i have no algae and my Phosphates are 0.04 ppm


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