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Old 11/02/2017, 12:41 AM   #26
JustAClownFish
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I work at a reef store. I measured my water a couple times with different test kits. I'll aim for a lower sg until my tank is fully stocked. This should, over time, get the Mg down.


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Old 11/02/2017, 03:39 AM   #27
chungsl
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Adding magnesium will tend to drop the rate of abiotic precipitation because magnesium fouls crystals as they form. That's one of the reasons that saltwater can be supersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate.
my tank saltwater's magnesium is 1550ppm because of dosing epsom salts water. Now there are some calcium carbonate "stone" formed on the surface of sand bed.


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Old 11/02/2017, 04:59 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by JustAClownFish View Post
I'll aim for a lower sg until my tank is fully stocked.
I suspect that a low SG could more harmful than a high magnesium level. I think that keeping the SG at no less than 1.025 is a good idea, although people are successful with somewhat lower levels.


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Old 11/02/2017, 06:37 PM   #29
karimwassef
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From personal experience- maintaining a high Mg, Ca and Alk allowed my corals to survive even as my salinity dipped to 1.019... they weren't happy but they didn't die either.


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Old 11/03/2017, 10:30 AM   #30
tmz
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fwiw. I've run my tanks for years at around 1500 to 1550 ppm for years without discernible negative effects on stony coral growth or inverts ; but a noticeable lack of abiotic calcium carbonate precipitation than at lower levels which I consider a plus.


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Current Tank Info: Tank of the Month , November 2011 : 600gal integrated system: 3 display tanks (120 g, 90g, 89g),several frag/grow out tanks, macroalgae refugia, cryptic zones. 40+ fish, seahorses, sps,lps,leathers, zoanthidae and non photosynthetic corals.
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Old 11/03/2017, 02:41 PM   #31
JustAClownFish
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Originally Posted by bertoni View Post
I suspect that a low SG could more harmful than a high magnesium level. I think that keeping the SG at no less than 1.025 is a good idea, although people are successful with somewhat lower levels.
I shoot for 1.024 so I have some wiggle room. If I don't top off my tank it'll go up to 1.026 in a matter of two days. Given that it should be fine. Before I mixed my water at around 1.026. Also, I don't want my alkalinity to skyrocket. When I used the coral pro salt mix I easily hit 13 dkh. I have no stony corals in my tank except a few tiny frog spawns and one hammer.


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Old 11/04/2017, 12:09 AM   #32
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1.026 is best, IMO; it's the average for seawater. Note, all animals rely on an internal sg to maintain live sustaining biochemical activity. Invertebrates can't osmo regulate like fish can by drinking and urinating and via their kidney functions; so ,for the animals like corals that don't osmoregulate their internal salinity is highly dependent on the surrounding water;if it's saltier than their internal sg they will loose fluids like a pickle; if it's lower it will flow into them and lower their internal sg. Either way it messes up their homeostasis which is necessary for life .


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Current Tank Info: Tank of the Month , November 2011 : 600gal integrated system: 3 display tanks (120 g, 90g, 89g),several frag/grow out tanks, macroalgae refugia, cryptic zones. 40+ fish, seahorses, sps,lps,leathers, zoanthidae and non photosynthetic corals.
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Old 11/04/2017, 03:19 PM   #33
JustAClownFish
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Yesterday I measured 1.025 so I can safely assume that it's going to be 1.026 by tonight due to evaporation.


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