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Old 12/31/2017, 08:08 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slief View Post
Not sure what kind of plastic fittings he was referring to when stating that Great White isnít plastic safe but for the most common plastics found in aquarium fittings and plumbing, itís perfectly safe. Iíve used it for years and never had an issue. In fact, I have fittings on my tank thatís were sealed over 10 years with the Great White and never had a leak. The key to using this stuff properly is to not evertighten the fittings. Here is the info right off the label and it discusses the materials itís designed to work with. I have the utmost respect for Russ but my expereince with the Great White is different but again, overtightening could be a factor if you arenít careful.
SNIPE---> Imaged removed.
Thanks for the info. Good to know.


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Old 01/01/2018, 12:10 PM   #27
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with pvc you can inject glue with a syringe if it is a small leak. That enables you to get it into the joint instead of just on the outside


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Old 01/01/2018, 12:17 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Member No. 1 View Post
The stuff to use for a pvc threaded connection is RectorSeal 5.
https://www.rectorseal.com/rectorseal-no-5/
You should NEVER use teflon tape on a plastic fitting. REPEAT NEVER!
Read this: http://www.lascofittings.com/threads

As to the bulkhead, if you are talking about the internal threads, see above, but if you are talking about the nut that holds it on, the external thread, no need for sealant. That is what the gasket is for. I have some that are over 5 years old, never seen a drop from bulkhead. Just be sure all surfaces are CLEAN! Then clean them again!

Here is a great write up that Russ did on the Neptune forum.
https://forum.neptunesystems.com/sho...mbing-Fittings
Gonna need a reason not to use teflon on pvc joints other than don't use it.


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Old 01/01/2018, 02:21 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhead View Post
Gonna need a reason not to use teflon on pvc joints other than don't use it.
Oldhead, Did you read thru the link I supplied? It's explained pretty well why you should never use teflon tape on pvc joints.

Quoted from the link, but view it in it's entirety as there are diagrams better explaining why.

Don't use Teflon tape, Teflon paste or pipe dope. Do use a sealant.

Teflon tape, Teflon paste and pipe dope is intended for metal pipe and fittings. Metal to metal fitting joints are more difficult to tighten than plastic; the surfaces tend to gall without the aid of such lubricants as Teflon or pipe dope. Plastic fittings do not need this lubrication.

When Teflon tape is wrapped around plastic male threads it adds to the strain and tensile stress. The tendency of most installers is to incorrectly wrap several thickness of tape around the male threads, increasing stain and stress further.

Teflon paste and pipe dope, just like Teflon tape, make threaded joints slippery. Their use on PVC fittings can be an invitation to over-torque.

When working with threaded plastic fittings do use a proper sealant. The right sealant for threaded joints is non-hardening, compatible with plastic and doesn't add slipperiness.

A non-hardening compound is forced by water pressure into potential points of leakage, thereby performing a true sealing function. Tapes and hardening pastes permit a leak path to develop when a joint is backed off, mechanically flexed, or expands with rising temperatures.



A sealing compound must be compatible to plastics. Many brands of pipe sealant contain oils, solvents or carriers that can damage plastic. A proper sealant must be certified by the manufacturer to be harmless to the fitting material and to not contaminate fluid in the pipe.

Finally, a sealing compound must not lubricate the joint to the point that over-tightening is encouraged. Several sealants on the market meet all these requirements.




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