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Old 02/09/2018, 10:55 AM   #1
Lissa1987
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structural support

I had planned on getting a 265 gallon tank to go in our library. Went through all the research steps (except the most obvious-can the floor support the tank -duh-) and even build my own stand because the manufactured ones looked flimsy and plain. Then I had the brilliant ah-ha moment that although the tank would be on the "First floor in the house" its actually the second story because the garage is underneath the entire house. The construction is block on block the entire 3 stories but to raise the flood elevation (Live on the bay) the builder started the living floors on the second story. Im trying to find out if that much weight is a possibility without having to pay a structural engineer 400 dollars just to come out and look at it just to be told yes or no. The tank would be situated flush against an exterior wall with another exterior wall forming a corner about 2-3 feet away. The ceiling is finished in the garage but I can see that there is a horizontal been running perpendicular and attaching to the exterior wall about 2-3 feet away on the other side. I'm attaching pictures in case my explanation makes no sense. lol
So any ideas if it is worth paying the engineer to come out? My boyfriend is worried about making any "structural changes" to the house so if its a no-go my future beautiful predator tank will cease to exist. tank.jpg

IMG_0143.jpg

IMG_0144.jpg


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Old 02/09/2018, 02:00 PM   #2
billdogg
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It's *probably* ok, but I'm not an engineer trained in that sort of stuff so take that for what it's worth. Any idea what the floor joists are, and their spacing? And are you positive that they will be running perpendicular to the tank? Is it possible to put a floor jack underneath? I understand that it is finished, but drywall cuts away easily and can be repaired just as easily in the future.

I tend to be overly cautious about these things - if it were mine I'd figure out a way to reinforce it "justincase".

Considering the investment you will be making in the tank and livestock it just might be worthwhile to have somebody who actually does know about these things take a look.


hth


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Old 02/09/2018, 02:54 PM   #3
lapin
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If you know who the architect is you can call and ask. He designed the plans with a cad program and should have some structural figures for general load bearing floors.


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Old 02/09/2018, 05:35 PM   #4
on the spot
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The "support" beam would suggest your tank would be sitting parallel to the floor joists.

For 400 dollars I'd cut a hole in the ceiling, add LVL or steel, and re-do the drywall.

Call it a bonding/learning about our house adventure.


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Old 02/10/2018, 04:48 PM   #5
AiKkz
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If you got the money its always best to get an engineer to take a look. if not the tank should sit Perpendicular to the trusses, make sure the right and left side on on top of the trusses and not in between if possible. Also move the tank over to sit on the support beam if possible.


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Old 02/10/2018, 11:20 PM   #6
Redllama1
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Im a licensed architect- depending on the age of the house, the original builder may have plans.

Looking at the pictures, the beam and wall most likely have joists running perpendicular to them, and most probably 16 on center.. if you place the tank as shown, you will be running the parallel to the joists. You dont want to do that. The best place for your tank is over the steel beam, or no too far from the beam, running parallel with the beam. You can also do a simple deflection test- get a thumb tack, and tie a string around it, hang it from the ceiling in the basement, and cut it off 1 above the floor. Start putting water in your tank, and watch the string. If it moves more than 1/16 you are going to have joist deflection issues.


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Old 02/10/2018, 11:24 PM   #7
JUNBUG361
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redllama1 View Post
Im a licensed architect- depending on the age of the house, the original builder may have plans.

Looking at the pictures, the beam and wall most likely have joists running perpendicular to them, and most probably 16 on center.. if you place the tank as shown, you will be running the parallel to the joists. You dont want to do that. The best place for your tank is over the steel beam, or no too far from the beam, running parallel with the beam. You can also do a simple deflection test- get a thumb tack, and tie a string around it, hang it from the ceiling in the basement, and cut it off 1 above the floor. Start putting water in your tank, and watch the string. If it moves more than 1/16 you are going to have joist deflection issues.


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Very Informative


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