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Old 12/01/2011, 05:59 AM   #1
chercm
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how to remove silica in the tank ?

how to do that ? i am running zeovit and i am using RODI


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Old 12/01/2011, 06:32 AM   #2
Randy Holmes-Farley
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Usually once you cut off the supply of silicate, the levels drop fairly rapidly. For that reason, I dose silicate.

What makes you think you have an issue?

GFO does a decent job of removing silicate if such a treatment is needed.


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Old 12/01/2011, 06:36 AM   #3
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i kept having brown algae on the rocks and the glass




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Old 12/01/2011, 07:38 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy Holmes-Farley View Post
Usually once you cut off the supply of silicate, the levels drop fairly rapidly. For that reason, I dose silicate.

What makes you think you have an issue?

GFO does a decent job of removing silicate if such a treatment is needed.
i used gfo but still having the brown algae


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Old 12/01/2011, 07:57 AM   #5
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any idea?


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Old 12/01/2011, 08:04 AM   #6
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Hard to say what organism is growing on your rock without a microscopic look at it. If it is a diatom reducing silica will help, otherwise if it is an algae, reducing silica will not help.

There is no miracle cure for algae, dinoflagellate & cyanobacteria & diatom pests in a reef tank.

The bottom line is that you want to reduce nitrate, phosphate, dissolved organics and suspended organics. You need to say no to all pests present in your tank and all debris in your tank. Keep a spick and span tank including the sand bed and glass. This will need to be completed often to erradicate these type of pests.


There are a lot of hobbyists in your same position. Reducing your nitrate and phosphate levels to a zero reading will help in getting rid of many type of algae and/or cyanobacterial pests. IME, reducing nitrate and phosphate levels too low can kill or cause problems for many types of soft coral. Running GAC & GFO will all help in reducing the growth of these type of pests. In many cases they will not eradicate the pest even when phosphate and nitrate are extemely low. Vinegar and/or Vodka dosing will help reduce the nitrate and phosphate levels also, but will not necessarily eradicate the pest either.

A common problem is being able to identify your pest to a category correctly: true algae, cyano, dino, bacteria & other assorted pests that look similar. In many cases a micro look at your pest is best to properly ID it to one of these categories.

IMHO, if you are faced with an algal type pest problem, it is best to implement an algae pest control program strategy:


1) Wet skimming with a good quality skimmer. Clean your skimmer cup at least once per week.

2) Reduce your nitrates and phosphates to a zero reading using the hobby grade test kits. See Randy's articles regarding this:

Phosphate and the Reef Aquarium
http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2006-09/rhf/index.php

Nitrate in the Reef Aquarium
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issu...t2003/chem.htm

3) Proper lighting. I find that the higher wavelength bulbs are less conducive to algae growth. I now run 20,000 K bulbs from using 10,000 K bulbs.

4) Proper day length is a good thing also. I would not run your lights for more than 12 hrs total. Keep in mind that light entering from a window nearby is added to this figure.

5) Running GAC is a good practice in my book. It will help reduce the total dissolved organic carbons in your tank water and this is a food source.

6) Proper 30% per month total water changes will help export the DOC as well as some of the pests in the water column. It will help maintain the micro-nutrients as well.

7) Physical removal of the pest by hand, scrubbing and siphoning is important as well. If the amount of pest in your aquarium is overwhelming, perhaps dealing with one section at a time is a better idea.

8) Proper water circulation in your tank to prevent dead zones. When dealing with cyanobacteria pests increasing the flow where it grows seems to help.

9) Use RODI water for all top-off, salt mixing, additive mixes... etc.

10) Dosing iron may have benefits for macro-algae, but if you are experiencing algae pest problems than I would stop dosing it as it can add to the problem in many cases.

11) If you are dosing other supplements such as vitamins, amino acids, or others that contain a mix of supplements other than the basic alk., calcium and magnesium, I would stop these until you gain control of your pest. This includes many of the store bought products with unknown ingredients. Dosing Vodka or vinegar to reduce your nitrates and phosphates would be an exception in my opinion.

12) Proper feeding habits. This can be the number one problem when trying to reduce your nitrate and phosphate levels. Use low phosphate fish foods.

13) IMHO, lighted refugiums may be a problem when trying to deal with an algae type pest problem. They are wonderful when it comes to reducing nitrates and phosphates. However, the light over most refugiums is conducive to the microalgae type pests. If the refugium becomes infested with a microalgae pest, I would clean it throughly of all pests as best as possible, remove the macro and turn off the lights until you gain control of your pest. Re-using the same macroalgae later may serve as a source for re-infestation of your pest.

14) Adding fish and other creatures that will eat your algae pest will help.

15) Running a diatom filter which has been suggested by Boomer, makes a lot of sense to me. It will help remove a lot of organic material in your water column.

16) Keep your sand bed clean if it is a shallow bed weekly by vacuuming it. Lightly vacuume deep sand bed surfaces.

17) Keep your tank glass clean all the way around regularly. Perhaps it will need to be done 2 to three times a week if growth is fast.

18) For some additional thoughts regarding switching an algae based system to a bacterial based system see this thread:
(Using a carbon source with appropriate bacterial dosing may possibly help to push your system to where you want it although this is controversial.)

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/sh....php?t=1781320

19) There are other items that can be added to this list if others care too share and some of the items listed may be disputed.


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Old 12/01/2011, 08:09 AM   #7
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If this pest is a diatom, removing the existing diatoms out of your tank will export silica fairly rapidly. The main thing then is to prevent any additional large amounts of silica from being added in the future.


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Old 12/01/2011, 08:09 AM   #8
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Parameters

DKh- 6.5
Mg 1400
Ca 490
No3 0
Po4 0

I have tried using phosban but does not seems to help at all


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Old 12/01/2011, 08:10 AM   #9
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I have been scraping the glass but it have been coming back


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Old 12/01/2011, 08:15 AM   #10
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I have been using rodi unit and my tds =0 how to remove the silica?


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Old 12/01/2011, 08:30 AM   #11
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Again:

If this pest is a diatom, removing the existing diatoms out of your tank will export silica fairly rapidly. The main thing then is to prevent any additional large amounts of silica from being added in the future.


This includes removing diatoms on a regular basis off of glass, rock, sand, equipment, out of the water column by filtration........etc.


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Old 12/01/2011, 08:32 AM   #12
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How to know if it is diatoms without micro scope?


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Old 12/01/2011, 08:41 AM   #13
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You really can't without a microscope. Therefore you need to assume this pest is possibly a diatom and concentrate on not adding any additional silica unnecessarily through foods, tap water, salt mixes that may be high in silica......etc., while getting all this pest out of your tank as best as possible.

Following the directions I itemized above will work if you diligently clean everything in your tank including rock, sand bed, glass and equipment on at least a weekly basis. You need to have good water filtration like perhaps a filter bag or diatom filter to clean the stuff out of your water column as you clean everything in your tank. Everything needs to remain clean in the tank.


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Old 12/01/2011, 12:54 PM   #14
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How much GFO are you using and when did you last replace it?


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Old 12/01/2011, 05:06 PM   #15
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I used 500ml of phosban and replaced every week , I think the main problem is that I scrape the brown algae and it dies in the tank causing po4 to raise. What is the proper way to clear it ?


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Old 12/01/2011, 06:24 PM   #16
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If you can't manipulate most of the algae out of the tank with the scraper, all I can suggest is to try siphoning as much as possible out of the system.


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Old 04/16/2015, 06:27 PM   #17
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I have a new 20g setup with brown water and some brown algae. Most of these forums say it is because of silica. I wanted to be sure, so I had my water test. It turns out they were right:

We uploaded your latest Aquarium Water Test Results to your account at www.aquamedicwatertesting.com/login

Date (mm-dd-yyyy) - Source - Test ID:
04-15-2015 - Office - 1 of 1*



Office - 1 of 1*
04-15-2015 Ammonia (NH3-4) Good 0 0.000 - 0.050 mg/L
04-15-2015 Nitrite (NO2) Good 0.005 0.000 - 0.100 mg/L
04-15-2015 Phosphate (PO4) Good 0.02 0.000 - 0.250 mg/L
04-15-2015 Nitrate (NO3) Good 1 0.000 - 25.000 mg/L
04-15-2015 Silica (Sio2-3) High 1.4 0.000 - 0.500 mg/L
04-15-2015 Potassium (K) Low 202 350.000 - 450.000 mg/L
04-15-2015 Ionic Calcium (Ca) Good 150 100.000 - 300.000 mg/L
04-15-2015 Boron (B) NA NA 3.000 - 6.000 mg/L
04-15-2015 Molybdenum (Mo) High 0.8 0.000 - 0.300 mg/L
04-15-2015 Strontium (Sr) Good 7.89 5.000 - 12.000 mg/L
04-15-2015 Magnesium (Mg) Good 1200 1100.000 - 1400.000 mg/L
04-15-2015 Iodine (I) High 0.18 0.030 - 0.090 mg/L
04-15-2015 Copper (Cu) Good 0.09 0.000 - 0.100 mg/L
04-15-2015 Alkalinity (meq/L) Low 2.2 2.500 - 5.000 meq/L
04-15-2015 Total Calcium (Ca) Good 350 350.000 - 450.000 mg/L
04-15-2015 Iron (Fe) NA NA 0.000 - 0.010 mg/L

Having test results like is very helpful as you know what you are trying to fix instead of just guessing. I am using live sand with RO/DI or LFS water and dry rock. I think the silicates may be leaching from the rock.

I got a Rowa phosphate/silicate remover and installed it in my filter. As soon as I did that, my protein skimmer exploded. I hadn't emptied the cup in several days and it was about 1/3 full of smelly gunk. Within 10 minutes of adding the Rowa, it had foamed over, completely filling the cup and flooding the tank with bubbles. Watch your skimmer carefully after adding any sort of rowa/phosban/seachem removers to your tank.


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Old 04/16/2015, 06:31 PM   #18
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If you can't manipulate most of the algae out of the tank with the scraper, all I can suggest is to try siphoning as much as possible out of the system.
I do that with my Oscar tank. My Oscar is a nitrate factory so I always have hair algae growing on the gravel. So when I change the water, I vacuum out the algae along the other gook that is in the gravel.


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Old 04/21/2018, 09:47 AM   #19
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Still no answer to how to remove silicates from water beyond RO and GFO? If RO isn't doing the job, what other means of filtration will remove silicates from water before adding fresh water to the system?


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Old 04/21/2018, 11:49 AM   #20
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Still no answer to how to remove silicates from water beyond RO and GFO? If RO isn't doing the job, what other means of filtration will remove silicates from water before adding fresh water to the system?
Are looking for a magical method? The two or three listed in this thread are easy, effective, and cheap. Doesn't get much better than that.


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Old 04/21/2018, 03:20 PM   #21
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DI will do the job, especially the "silica buster" cartridges. I wouldn't bother, because silica is unlikely to cause a problem. I dosed it for years to see what it might do for snails and sponges.


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Old 04/21/2018, 10:25 PM   #22
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Are looking for a magical method? The two or three listed in this thread are easy, effective, and cheap. Doesn't get much better than that.
All I'm saying is wouldn't it be easier to not add silicates in the first place, which would be an effective way of eliminating the problem before it exists. Cheap? No such thing in this hobby and anyone concerned about cost is in for a rude awakening. My point is RO is not cutting it alone so I am looking for an additional filtration process for my water source to make silicate free water changes possible. Water changes are supposed to benefit the system and my circumstances are not beneficial. Each water change is making my glass get covered in brown algae/diatoms so obviously my water is the problem.

I understand what GFO, RO, Carbon, and Export do but I am not a water filtration expert and like the OP I am looking beyond what every forum topic on this matter points to and actually find a solution to my water conditions. My thought is I am not taking care of rock, coral, or fish for that matter. I am primarily doing all I do in this hobby to maintain water conditions. I'm speaking with the water department on Monday and will find out exactly what the issue is with my water source. When I get the answer I will post back with my solution in hopes to help someone else with difficult source water causing the case in point. Thanks for your feedback!


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Old 04/21/2018, 10:32 PM   #23
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DI will do the job, especially the "silica buster" cartridges. I wouldn't bother, because silica is unlikely to cause a problem. I dosed it for years to see what it might do for snails and sponges.
Problem is I have replaced all of my RO/DI and my water reads 0 TLS. I have even gone as far as running RO through GFO and Carbon prior to mixing saltwater and still every water change brings back diatoms. I just integrated a 170 gallon sump with 24 he light so algae in the sump should overpower my display. In a perfect world.


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Old 04/21/2018, 10:32 PM   #24
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https://www.amazon.com/SpectraPure-S.../dp/B009139YM2

Problem solved going in. With water changes it will dilute out in the DT.


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Old 04/21/2018, 10:43 PM   #25
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I have even gone as far as running RO through GFO and Carbon prior to mixing saltwater and still every water change brings back diatoms.
Are you sure that you are seeing diatoms? Snails like Trochus should be happy to eat diatoms. You could work on some form of nutrient control, I guess. Diatoms need phosphate and fixed nitrogen to grow, for example.


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