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Old 11/24/2017, 11:46 AM   #1
Pandagobyguy
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Dwarf seahorse biotope

Looking for info on the native environment of the dwarf seahorse. I understand they typically live on eelgrass (zostera marina) but, in a 10 gallon can you grow this large type? If not would zostera noltei be a suitable (and biotope accurate?) replacement?

I am also looking for any info on other species (inverts, etc) that are in eelgrass ecosystems and will not disturb seahorse breeding.

Final question, is miracle mud underneath sand required for eelgrass? Are there alternative substrates? Can plain sand and root tabs work?


Any other tips about breeding or tank setup is greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance.
-Oliver


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Old 11/24/2017, 06:59 PM   #2
vlangel
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I have not kept dwarf seahorses but I have read a lot. I also know that they are very vulnerable to bacterial infections like their bigger relatives which I do keep.

For that reason I would be hesitant to use a DSB which would be necessary to grow any sort of grass. Also I would be hesitant to fertilize any type of grasses. Food is more easily trapped on sandbeds which could fuel pathogenic bacteria. I just don't know if fertilizers used to nourish the grasses could potentially encourage dangerous bacterias.
Also can the grasses endure treatments for hydroids which can be problematic. That is why most coral are not kept in DSH tanks because the coral do not respond well to the med used to kill hydroids.

Perhaps someone who has actual experience with dwarf seahorses will jump in.


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Old 11/24/2017, 08:56 PM   #3
Pandagobyguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vlangel View Post
I have not kept dwarf seahorses but I have read a lot. I also know that they are very vulnerable to bacterial infections like their bigger relatives which I do keep.

For that reason I would be hesitant to use a DSB which would be necessary to grow any sort of grass. Also I would be hesitant to fertilize any type of grasses. Food is more easily trapped on sandbeds which could fuel pathogenic bacteria. I just don't know if fertilizers used to nourish the grasses could potentially encourage dangerous bacterias.
Also can the grasses endure treatments for hydroids which can be problematic. That is why most coral are not kept in DSH tanks because the coral do not respond well to the med used to kill hydroids.

Perhaps someone who has actual experience with dwarf seahorses will jump in.
Hmm thanks for the info. I clearly need to research more as i didnt even realize hydroids were a typical issue with DSH tanks (although that makes sense now considering the phyto/roti density).


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Old 11/25/2017, 01:56 PM   #4
rayjay
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Can't help with live plants as I've only used artificial decor/hitching and bare bottom as a means of making it easier to maintain water quality which is the number one necessity IMO for success.
If you do go with in tank copepods, or even external cultures of copepods, be sure to go heaviest on the pelagic types as I found that benthic types like tisbe are not sought after much by the dwarfs.
IME, dwarfs are probably the laziest seahorses I've kept over the years as they just don't like (for the most part anyway) to hunt down their food, preferring to stay hitched and wait for it to come to them close enough to snick.
Some of their larger cousins are this way (mainly males) but not to the same degree as the zosterae.


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Old 01/19/2018, 01:19 AM   #5
socalireefdood
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These things sound really hard to keep, i've always wanted a seahorse tank but are they as hard as people say? following


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Old 01/19/2018, 06:53 AM   #6
vlangel
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These things sound really hard to keep, i've always wanted a seahorse tank but are they as hard as people say? following
What makes dwarf seahorses challenging is that they need large densities of live food several times a day and excellant water quality. The rigor of daily hatching bbs and enriching is more than most folks can do for very long.


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