Reef Central Online Community
Tunze USA

Home Forum Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences View New Posts View Today's Posts

Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Search Reefkeeping ...an online magazine for marine aquarists Support our sponsors and mention Reef Central

Go Back   Reef Central Online Community > Marine Fish Forums > Seahorses & Pipefish
Register Blogs FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Notices

User Tag List

Reply
Thread Tools
Old 02/01/2016, 08:38 PM   #1
Seahorse.Lover
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 10
Tank Setup

Could anyone tell me what exactly I need to buy to get a seahorse tank started? I have researched a lot but I still don't know.. I don't have a clue where to start!!


Seahorse.Lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/01/2016, 08:58 PM   #2
leviburns89
Registered Member
 
leviburns89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 652
Low flow, and very little to zero objects for them to injure themselves on.

Seahorses are extremely fragile, too much flow, can toss them into an object and injure them.

There are some great youtube videos on the subject, and I think the show "Tanked" did an episode on seahorses.

It can be done, and maybe even with less of an investment than a normal reef tank.

Just keep in mind they are extremely fragile, and should be the only inhabitants in the tank.

I'm pretty sure what I saw recommends a round or cylindrical tank vs square/rectangular. This reduces the odds that they will run into a wall and get hurt


leviburns89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/01/2016, 10:45 PM   #3
rayjay
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,937
LOW FLOW is the WRONG way to go. You want at a minimum, 10X flow but more is better.
In almost 13 yrs I've never had a round tank, always rectangular of many sizes.
The only round "tank" I've used is a muck bucket nursery for raising fry.
In my years here and on the "org" I don't think I've seen even 1% of hobyists using round tanks for their seahorse displays.
I don't consider them to be EXTREMELY fragile, at least not in the way I think you mean, but they are very susceptible to damaging/deadly bacterial and parasitic influences.


__________________
Seahorses. Culture nanno, rotifers and brine shrimp.

Current Tank Info: Seahorses
rayjay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/01/2016, 11:17 PM   #4
Jeff4777
Registered Member
 
Jeff4777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 518
Quote:
Originally Posted by leviburns89 View Post
Low flow, and very little to zero objects for them to injure themselves on.

Seahorses are extremely fragile, too much flow, can toss them into an object and injure them.

There are some great youtube videos on the subject, and I think the show "Tanked" did an episode on seahorses.

It can be done, and maybe even with less of an investment than a normal reef tank.

Just keep in mind they are extremely fragile, and should be the only inhabitants in the tank.

I'm pretty sure what I saw recommends a round or cylindrical tank vs square/rectangular. This reduces the odds that they will run into a wall and get hurt
Low, medium, and high flow spots are good. Zero objects? You need hitching posts. Seahorses like to grab to things with their tail as they swim around and hitch onto objects like macro algae, branching live rock, gorgonian/other non stinging coral, and more.

Yes youtube has some nice videos on seahorses, just be careful as there is false information out there. Did you just refer someone to see "Tanked" for educational purposes?..

Think you have the wrong idea about fragile. You can pick them up and move them around somewhat quickly with no harm or stress if the horse is use to you. (My female H. Erectus swims to my hand grabbing fingers with her tail now.) Their more fragile in the sense of disease, bacteria, pouch emphysema, gas bubble disease, pathogens, ect. They don't have to be the only inhabitants of the tank. As long as other fish are mellow they shouldn't stress the horses. However this adds a great risk to disease and pathogens the seahorses may have never seen\have no immunity to from the fish. QT the fish and treating them with things like prazipro and what not could help. Also try to get captive bred fish if you must have fish, like a yellow watchman goby or something. I just have snails in my seahorse tank though personally keeping it a species only.

Cylinder tank vs square\rectangular really doesn't matter. Running into a wall shouldn't be a concern for a healthy seahorse. The biggest importance in your tank dimensions is the height. Unlike fish needing length to swim, sea horses typically keep themselves vertical and need room to swim upwards when performing their mating ritual.



Last edited by Jeff4777; 02/01/2016 at 11:27 PM.
Jeff4777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/02/2016, 11:04 AM   #5
leviburns89
Registered Member
 
leviburns89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 652
Just going by what I've read. No one was helping this person, so I added my two cents.


leviburns89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/02/2016, 03:06 PM   #6
rayjay
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,937
Quote:
Originally Posted by leviburns89 View Post
Just going by what I've read. No one was helping this person, so I added my two cents.
Yes, I can see the need as it was 20 minutes after his post that you added yours.


__________________
Seahorses. Culture nanno, rotifers and brine shrimp.

Current Tank Info: Seahorses
rayjay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/02/2016, 04:37 PM   #7
leviburns89
Registered Member
 
leviburns89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 652
To the OP

I apologize for giving incorrect information.

I also apologize for making a feeding spot for people to argue. I am above this.

Good luck and best wishes


leviburns89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/02/2016, 07:17 PM   #8
leviburns89
Registered Member
 
leviburns89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 652
And just so I can save some face.

Here are some links

http://www.fishchannel.com/fish-heal...seahorses.aspx

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2004/12/fish2

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...b4AN5AiilRK7FA


leviburns89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/02/2016, 10:39 PM   #9
rayjay
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,937
I'm sorry you were only able to see these sites without the benefit of more up to date information. I wish it were not so, but with the internet it is a fact of life on probably any topic you could pick.
Unfortunately, all three pieces were written a long time ago and have many factual pieces of information but also have many facts that are not true. Some of the facts were accepted more than a dozen years ago, but knowledge in the seahorse hobby has evolved very rapidly over the last decade plus years such that many BOOKS written about seahorse were out of date as far as some of the contained information even before they were published. Other facts were just not true right from the get go. For example, stating seahorses preferred cooler temperatues. They don't PREFER cooler temperatures but in captive situations like our tanks, it is VERY advantageous to keep them at lower temperatures to help keep nasty bacteria at bay.
Unfortunately, even the last link there has multiple errors in it as well as other pages on the site, and, IT is from the best internet site available for seahorse keepers.
There just aren't enough knowledgeable people who are capable AND willing to correct so much old information on the site. Much of the information is still valid, but there is so much that experience has shown to be incorrect.
There is another newer seahorse site with more up to date information but it doesn't have near the traffic on the forums there as so many people are unaware of it. You can check out the many articles on it that Tami has amassed in recent years by some knowledgeable people by searching out seahorsetalk fusedjaw.


__________________
Seahorses. Culture nanno, rotifers and brine shrimp.

Current Tank Info: Seahorses
rayjay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/04/2016, 06:52 AM   #10
leviburns89
Registered Member
 
leviburns89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 652
Omg dude, seriously, all you do is say the opposite of what I say.

I have give actual published info. You are merely giving anecdotal evidence.

Will a mod please close this thread, and give the OP some links. It's maddening how immature people are sometimes.

Anecdotal info from Rayjay, simply one persons opinion, which means zilch

Overuse of italicized content also signifies retaliation, which is no use to the op.

I will not return to this thread, so feel free to continue to try and rebuke me vs help the op. I won't see it, so have fun


leviburns89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/04/2016, 09:36 AM   #11
rayjay
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,937
Yes, what I write is only MY opinion. It is mostly based on my 12 years of seahorse keeping and breeding, but is ALSO made up of how I've interpreted the information gleaned from reading the posts of more knowledgeable hobbyists and breeders on here and on the "org".
I DO at times state that what I write is my opinion, and also at times mention to get other opinions. I DON'T see the need to say this on every post I make.
I feel that it's important to comment on something that posted which is contrary to present acceptance in the hobby so that new hobbyists are not misled.
As for capitalization and use of italics in my writing, it is to emphasize the word much like while talking, we often speak a word in a higher pitch or speak a word with a slightly higher volume to better express what we are saying.
There are a myriad of ways to be successful in seahorse keeping, but there are certain basics that can help the chances of success be greater.


__________________
Seahorses. Culture nanno, rotifers and brine shrimp.

Current Tank Info: Seahorses
rayjay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/04/2016, 05:30 PM   #12
redhorse
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Rancho Cucamonga. CA
Posts: 115
WOW! Maybe someone should look at Rayjay and his experience with seahorses and his successful breeding info.

I don't post because of all the misguided info out there and experience with people wanting something they have no clue about.

Even with the most current info it is personal experience that make for success with these great creatures.

Don't look at the information having feelings but just information (nobody will get offended that way). IT is important to give the correct info at first because we don't know when the person starting the blog will return (it has happened before) and 2 months later they are back wondering why their seahorse in not eating, bloated, or a number of other issues.
ALSO
Quoted::
"Anecdotal info from Rayjay, simply one persons opinion, which means zilch" <---------That was uncalled for and if that means zilch = Rayjay + opinion
your totally WRONG. Rayjay and his info is experience along with trial and error and is one of the MOST (did type one of) with experience in the matter.

That's my story and I am sticking to it....... Now have a wonderful day watching and caring for your ponies. I DO! :-)
Peace out!



Last edited by redhorse; 02/04/2016 at 05:38 PM. Reason: info
redhorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/04/2016, 07:51 PM   #13
Seahorse.Lover
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 10
Tank

I've been seeing a 47G column tank that is 30"H that many people use for their seahorses. But I cannot find a tank like this anywhere. Any suggestions?


Seahorse.Lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/04/2016, 08:23 PM   #14
Jeff4777
Registered Member
 
Jeff4777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seahorse.Lover View Post
I've been seeing a 47G column tank that is 30"H that many people use for their seahorses. But I cannot find a tank like this anywhere. Any suggestions?
Anything could work. As long as its 18" tall you should be okay. I'm sure people have horses in shorter tanks. Taller the better of course. The bigger the tank, the more horses you can get later on too! Keep in mind, past 26" or so gets pretty hard to reach the bottom of the tank without dipping your shoulder in it.


Jeff4777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
tank setup

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:55 PM.


TapaTalk Enabled

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2018 Axivo Inc.
Use of this web site is subject to the terms and conditions described in the user agreement.
Reef CentralTM Reef Central, LLC. Copyright 1999-2014
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.3.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.