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Old 02/11/2014, 10:01 AM   #1
brandoniscool
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Corals & Anatomies, what's the difference?

Hi my name is Will. My teacher is Mr.Rutherford. Now my job in the 3rd grade gifted class with Tina is writing letters on the computer. Pretty fun! Back to the question, we have a 160 gallon reef tank and my question is what is the difference between corals and anatomies? I think of that question because fishes like anatomies better than corals. They're about the same soft but fishes just like anatomies better.



Thanks,
Will


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Old 02/11/2014, 10:12 AM   #2
SGT_York
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Will,

Great question, Anemone's are a favorite of many types of clown fish and other creatures. There are many differences between the corals but one very important detail is that Anemone's can move around. Corals are more like plants and can only grow where they are at.


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Old 02/11/2014, 10:53 AM   #3
slowjazz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brandoniscool View Post
Hi my name is Will. My teacher is Mr.Rutherford. Now my job in the 3rd grade gifted class with Tina is writing letters on the computer. Pretty fun! Back to the question, we have a 160 gallon reef tank and my question is what is the difference between corals and anatomies? I think of that question because fishes like anatomies better than corals. They're about the same soft but fishes just like anatomies better.



Thanks,
Will
wow! great question.

Off top of my head in simple non scientific terms -
corals are single cells living together
Anemone's are a single species

Anemone's are more like jelly fish, then a normal fish.
The can and will move, coral does not move.
Both have a symbiotic relationship with zooxanthellae, zoochlorellae or both
both can sting
both eat about the same way and export waste about the same way. (in and out through their mouth)


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Old 02/11/2014, 11:29 AM   #4
Mcgeezer
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I love seeing you guys asking questions....and i wish my school was as cool as yours in having a reef tank!

Per wikipedia,

A sea anemone is a polyp attached at the bottom to the surface beneath it by an adhesive foot, called a basal disc, with a column-shaped body ending in an oral disc. Most are from 1.8 to 3 centimetres (0.71 to 1.18 in) in diameter, but anemones as small as 4 millimetres (0.16 in) or as large as nearly 2 metres (6.6 ft) are known.[3] They can have anywhere from a few tens to a few hundred tentacles.

A few species are pelagic and are not attached to the bottom; instead they have a gas chamber within the pedal disc, allowing them to float upside down in the water.[4]

The mouth is in the middle of the oral disc surrounded by tentacles armed with many cnidocytes, which are cells that function as a defense and as a means to capture prey. Cnidocytes contain nematocyst, capsule-like organelles capable of everting, giving phylum Cnidaria its name.[5] The cnidae that sting are called nematocysts. Each nematocyst contains a small vesicle filled with toxins (actinoporins), an inner filament, and an external sensory hair. A touch to the hair mechanically triggers a cell explosion—which launches a harpoon-like structure that attaches to organisms that trigger it, and injects a dose of venom in the flesh of the aggressor or prey. This gives the anemone its characteristic sticky feeling. The sea anemone eats small fish and shrimp.

The venom is a mix of toxins, including neurotoxins, that paralyzes the prey so the anemone can move it to the mouth for digestion inside the gastrovascular cavity. Actinoporins have been reported as highly toxic to fish and crustaceans, which are the natural prey of sea anemones. Anemonefish (clownfish), small banded fish in various colors, are not affected by their host anemone's sting and shelter themselves from predators among its tentacles.[6] Most sea anemones are harmless to humans, but a few highly toxic species have caused severe injuries and are potentially lethal.[7]

The internal anatomy of anemones is quite complex.

**********

Corals are marine invertebrates in class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria typically living in compact colonies of many identical individual "polyps". The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton.

A coral "head" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a spineless animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon.

Although some corals can catch small fish and plankton, using stinging cells on their tentacles, like those in sea anemone and jellyfish, most corals obtain the majority of their energy and nutrients from photosynthetic unicellular algae that live within the coral's tissue called zooxanthella (also known as Symbiodinium). Such corals require sunlight and grow in clear, shallow water, typically at depths shallower than 60 metres (200 ft). Corals can be major contributors to the physical structure of the coral reefs that develop in tropical and subtropical waters, such as the enormous Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Queensland, Australia. Other corals do not have associated algae and can live in much deeper water, with the cold-water genus Lophelia surviving as deep as 3,000 metres (9,800 ft).[3] Examples live on the Darwin Mounds, north-west of Cape Wrath, Scotland. Corals have also been found off the coast of the U.S. in Washington State and the Aleutian Islands in Alaska.


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