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Old 01/24/2011, 09:28 PM   #26
Nightwitch
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It's green, not yellow. Look up the difference between additive color and subtractive color.


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Old 01/29/2011, 12:34 AM   #27
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It's green, not yellow. Look up the difference between additive color and subtractive color.
Monitors and elecronics use RGB (Red, Green and Blue) to form the images, it does not mean that those are primary colors. Lately a TV manufacturer is adding yeelow to that so becoming RGBY.
In painting and graphic arts, primary colors (Meaning those that can not be made by combining other colors) are red, yellow and blue. Green is made with yellow and blue, orange with yellow and red, purple with blue and red, brown with red, yellow and blue and so on.


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Old 05/05/2011, 12:41 PM   #28
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Here is a quick video clip of the eye of an Odontodactylus scyllarus showing the pseudopupils as the eyes scan. Unfortunately, the eye on the left is damaged.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W92xB-dz9jk
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Old 09/16/2011, 09:11 PM   #29
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There are up to 16 visual pigments that respond from 300 to 700 nm.
Roy
I have electrophys evidence that some photoreceptor cells in G.smithii have a lambda max at around 720 nm and the response gone done to near noise at about 760 nm


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Old 01/23/2012, 11:43 AM   #30
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That video is awesome. I thought I was trippin' when I saw my mantis' eyes doing that. Thanks for posting.


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Old 06/19/2012, 06:29 PM   #31
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So how far can Odontodactylus Scyllarus see? If I am 5 feet away eating at the table can it clearly see what I am doing?


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Old 06/19/2012, 06:40 PM   #32
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If my memory serves me rite...O.scy has some of the lesser developed eyes in comparison to other species, Spearers tend to have the most advanced eyes.


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Old 06/20/2012, 09:53 AM   #33
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In terms of color and polarization vision, Odontodactylids are probably the best.

Resolution is not as good as our vision, but close - and certainly better at picking up movement.

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Old 06/20/2012, 06:29 PM   #34
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well there you go =)

But I am pritty certain that its the spearers whom have greater depth perception.


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Old 06/20/2012, 06:35 PM   #35
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No, it depends on the size and shape of the eye and the size and orientation of the ommatidia. You may have assumed this because many spearers have bilobed, elongated eyes which should give better parallax, but some spearers such as P. ciliata don't have bilobed eyes and some smashers do.

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Old 06/20/2012, 09:38 PM   #36
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No, it depends on the size and shape of the eye and the size and orientation of the ommatidia. You may have assumed this because many spearers have bilobed, elongated eyes which should give better parallax, but some spearers such as P. ciliata don't have bilobed eyes and some smashers do.

ROy
I am not one to dispute anything you put forward.

Having said that nearly everything that I provide on here (minus my own pics / vids) is just something you have told me/us on here before, I do not have a photographic memory so lots of it is "I recall reading" which doesn't exactly equate to an exact answer....

I have never known "exactly" what species has greater vision in others all I know is what has been already once stated.....I cannot recall the threads name or the reason to the thread but I do distinctly (for some reason) remember you telling (us/me) that O.scy has some of the worst eye site (doesn't mean its actually bad/blind... I mean the worst eye site for a stomatopod still far exceeds our own) but in direct comparison to other stomatopods.

Also recall you saying once (either to me directly in a PM or in a thread) that spearers posses the best depth perception out of the 2 sub species mostly for the sake of there raptorial appendages.

beyond those 2 things I can't remember much about eyes directly....

Hence why I am confused o_O maybe I need to brush up on the eyes a bit...


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Old 06/20/2012, 09:58 PM   #37
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So how far can an Odontodactylus scyllarus see?


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Old 10/04/2013, 11:30 PM   #38
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Someone told me G. smithii in perticular has the strongest vision out of all stomatopods... thoughts on this?

Joe


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Old 10/06/2013, 06:11 PM   #39
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What do you mean by "strongest"?

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Old 10/06/2013, 06:13 PM   #40
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What do you mean by "strongest"?

Roy
By strongest I mean most complex eyes out of any other stomatopods (Like it can see one more color or light spectrum then all the others)

Didn't know how to word it exactly.

Joe


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Old 10/07/2013, 09:08 AM   #41
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The ability of G. smithii to distinguish colors in the visible spectrum is actually not very good. Your eye is actually much better. G. smithii does have a complex polarization system and sees much further in to the UV. but in terms of color discrimination and acuity, it is not so hot.

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Old 10/12/2013, 06:26 PM   #42
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Makes me wonder, is there was any way to replacate the vision of a mantis in glasses and see for ourselves what it is like. When I was a kid they had glasses that replacated a regular preying mantis's vision but I'd like to see a stomatopod's vision first hand as well


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Old 10/14/2013, 12:52 PM   #43
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I don't think it would be remotely possible for us to imagine or see how a creature with compound eyes sees. Their brains are wired differently and process the incoming information differently than ours do.


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Old 10/14/2013, 01:12 PM   #44
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I don't think it would be remotely possible for us to imagine or see how a creature with compound eyes sees. Their brains are wired differently and process the incoming information differently than ours do.
Like said, I had glasses when I was a kid that showed me the vision of a regular praying mantis, a bee, an ant, and I think a cricket too.

Its possible, but mantis shrimp can only see certain colors and light spectrums so It makes me wonder if its possible to have glasses that enable us to see that.


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Old 10/14/2013, 01:30 PM   #45
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You weren't seeing what a mantis/bee/ant would see. Your brain and your non-compound eyes were showing you an image from a set of glasses that probably had a large number of smaller lenses. That has nothing to do with what a creature with compound eyes sees.

I'm pretty sure you could not functionally see while wearing those glasses like a creature with compound eyes. It's too bad they teach kids junk science like this.


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Old 10/14/2013, 01:47 PM   #46
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Actually, it showed all these different colors and the glasses where all divided (looked like they were made of diamonds) for the compound eyes. Of course my brain didn't function like I would be able to identify what is what like the insect would but it seemed pretty accurate when reading about insect visions.


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Old 11/24/2013, 09:09 PM   #47
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Really neat pic of the "pupil". One thing that comes to mind that uses the same technique is the traffic light sensor; it has a tube that points at oncoming cars, and only when the headlights are shining down the tube do the lights change.


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Old 06/24/2016, 12:36 AM   #48
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Very cool read, thank you!


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