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Old 02/04/2015, 07:09 AM   #26
kizanne
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sefannie that is an awesome picture.


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Sterile is not better. Successfully breeding : Banggai. Working on Ruby Red dragonets, Blue Mandarins, Davinci Clowns, Coral Crouchers, Pink Skunk Clowns and Yasha Gobies.

Current Tank Info: 125 gal tank, 40 gal refugium - 8/14 * 30 gal Ruby Red tank * 10 gal copepod
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Old 02/09/2015, 04:38 PM   #27
Betta132
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It is! Always awesome when they burrow up next to the glass.
Chaeto is probably a good addition to any rearing tank you set up. It'll grow pods, provide hiding spots, and eat nitrates. Caulerpa prolifera might also be an option, but it's not as good for pods. Just good for nitrate sucking.


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When you put an animal of any kind in a situation where it can no longer fend for itself,
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Old 02/09/2015, 05:16 PM   #28
Luis A M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billsreef View Post
When the female gets buried in, it's generally because she's tending eggs. So it's a good bet they've spawned
Sorry to disagree here,but it is always the male,not the female,the tending member of the pair in most marine fish,at least in all the tropical marine ornamentals that I know.

I had worked with this species in the past and posted it elsewhere.


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Current Tank Info: I keep about 40 tanks,for breeding and larval raising.Most are 10 gallons.
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Old 02/09/2015, 11:17 PM   #29
gogo7
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i feel that it's the male that stays buried in the tunnels for days on end.
i used to think it was the female out of my breeding pair of stonogobiops nematodes that stayed in the tunnels... until i got some good photos of the pair together...the fatter of a breeding pair is almost always the female.


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Old 02/10/2015, 06:40 AM   #30
billsreef
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis A M View Post
Sorry to disagree here,but it is always the male,not the female,the tending member of the pair in most marine fish,at least in all the tropical marine ornamentals that I know.

I had worked with this species in the past and posted it elsewhere.
I'd have double my check my notes on the pair I had breeding some years back. Unfortunately those notes are living in an attic back on LI. Pretty sure I recall it was the female of my pair that stayed behind in the burrow...based on body condition pre and post spawning. They had dug the burrow right down to the glass, and the tank stand was the sort that allowed me to look up from the bottom and spy on the nest and care.


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"LOL, well I have no brain apparently. " - dc (Debi)

Current Tank Info: Far too many tanks according to my wife, LOL.
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Old 02/15/2015, 09:56 AM   #31
Luis A M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billsreef View Post
I'd have double my check my notes on the pair I had breeding some years back. Unfortunately those notes are living in an attic back on LI. Pretty sure I recall it was the female of my pair that stayed behind in the burrow...based on body condition pre and post spawning. They had dug the burrow right down to the glass, and the tank stand was the sort that allowed me to look up from the bottom and spy on the nest and care.
When some brooding care is provided to the spawn;be it nest care,pouch brooding,mouth brooding or egg ball care,it is the male the one who takes the chore.
This is particularly true with gobies,where even if there are about 2,000 species with many different ways of life,it is always the father who cares for the nest.Quoting from "The Biology of Gobies"(CRC Press,2011):

"a basic reproductive pattern shared by all gobies consisting of the laying of demersal eggs cared for by the male until hatching"


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Current Tank Info: I keep about 40 tanks,for breeding and larval raising.Most are 10 gallons.
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Old 02/17/2015, 01:07 AM   #32
stefannie
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How long before they hatch and start to notice lil babies?


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Old 10/18/2017, 11:27 AM   #33
zelna
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hi there
i have sandsifting gobys that had some eggs how long does it take to hatch its been in the hole for a month that they keep it hiddin inside the hole


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