Reef Central Online Community
Premium Aquatics

Home Forum Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences View New Posts View Today's Posts

Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Search Reefkeeping ...an online magazine for marine aquarists Support our sponsors and mention Reef Central

Go Back   Reef Central Online Community > Marine Fish Forums > Fish Only & Aggressive Tanks
Register Blogs FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Notices

Reply
Thread Tools
Old 08/03/2004, 08:28 AM   #26
EdKruzel
Premium Member
 
EdKruzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 7,384
Give it the remainder of the week before going to live foods.

Try glass shrimp if you have to take the live route.

Ed


__________________
When you find yourself in "Deep Water" it's best to keep your mouth shut!

Current Tank Info: 65RR Cube Mixed Reef
EdKruzel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08/03/2004, 09:18 AM   #27
xxaquanutxx
Registered Member
 
xxaquanutxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands
Posts: 1,075
One thing that I believe everyone should do before buying thier fish from the LFS is to watch thier fish eat at the LFS. That way you have seen first hand what it eats, how it eats and it will have a full belly.


__________________
Fish Girl Signing off!

Current Tank Info: Starting it all over from scratch! 1- 10G amazon tank, 1-10G planted goldfish tank...Working on: 2- 5.5G Nano, 1-2G Hex Nano, 1-10G Nano, 1-65G Predator tank.... Future project in January: 1-65G Reef, 1-55G Reef, 1-55G split cichlid/Shablunkin tank.
xxaquanutxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08/03/2004, 09:54 AM   #28
EdKruzel
Premium Member
 
EdKruzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 7,384
Good point; you do want to see a fish eat at the LFS before purchase, however not with a "full belly".

Once satisfied (diet) a fish needs to relax and digest; capture and transport to our home systems is very stressful.

If you observe your new specimen eat a full meal, simply have your LFS hold it over night and pick it up the following day.

Ed


__________________
When you find yourself in "Deep Water" it's best to keep your mouth shut!

Current Tank Info: 65RR Cube Mixed Reef
EdKruzel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08/03/2004, 10:00 AM   #29
xxaquanutxx
Registered Member
 
xxaquanutxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands
Posts: 1,075
Now that I didnt know


__________________
Fish Girl Signing off!

Current Tank Info: Starting it all over from scratch! 1- 10G amazon tank, 1-10G planted goldfish tank...Working on: 2- 5.5G Nano, 1-2G Hex Nano, 1-10G Nano, 1-65G Predator tank.... Future project in January: 1-65G Reef, 1-55G Reef, 1-55G split cichlid/Shablunkin tank.
xxaquanutxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08/25/2004, 02:34 PM   #30
jimmyrickson
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Jensen Beach, FL
Posts: 24
See, it seems you imply the LFS is at fault for the fuzzy's lack of appetite. Its only been THREE DAYS, and you've not mentioned anything of you water parameters versus the store's, acclimation scheme, etc. Y'all are so quick to blame, defame, and verbally maim LFS employees... ITS NOT RIGHT, dammit! Lemme give you a tip, don't always ask for to talk with the owner ... uh yeah, he's out to get as much money as as possible with considerations to keeping you as a customer coming almost exclusively in the form of silver-tongued presention...


jimmyrickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08/27/2004, 08:41 PM   #31
cfd3lsd
Registered Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 159
jimmyrickson,
Talk about over reaction...Read my post again, I said that the owner advise me not to purchase a more expensive fish that was only eating live food, instead he recommend this fish. In other words, I did not feel like I was being taken or duped by the lfs owner. Keep your unwanted, off-topic tips to yourself.


On a separate note, thanks to all who provided me with helpful information. My dwarf-lion is doing great. He eats frozen krill like crazy. He will only eat the shrimp with the heads left on. I think he likes to look his prey in the eyes before inhaling it.



cfd3lsd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08/27/2004, 08:46 PM   #32
xxaquanutxx
Registered Member
 
xxaquanutxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands
Posts: 1,075
it doesnt look like he was implying anything to me


__________________
Fish Girl Signing off!

Current Tank Info: Starting it all over from scratch! 1- 10G amazon tank, 1-10G planted goldfish tank...Working on: 2- 5.5G Nano, 1-2G Hex Nano, 1-10G Nano, 1-65G Predator tank.... Future project in January: 1-65G Reef, 1-55G Reef, 1-55G split cichlid/Shablunkin tank.
xxaquanutxx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08/27/2004, 10:00 PM   #33
M.Dandaneau
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: 1477 S. Prescott Ave., Clearwater, Florida. Phone: (727) 443-6459
Posts: 3,258
The "heds on" point that he brought up is often very important if not key to success in switching over from live foods.
Many to most predatory animals that consume their prey whole do so head first and for some very important reasons.
If a fish is swallowed tail first, then the spines iin the fins come up and stick into the mouth and palate, where if swallowed head first the fins fold neatly and it's a smooth process.
Additionally, most prey can't go backwards, thus predators position themsrlves slightly to the front so that they can seize it the second it starts to move.
Predators can't afford to waste energy in useless pursuit or they'd be burning more fuel than they make from eating it.
If you take frozen silversides and cut the head at a 45 degree angle, front to back, you'll end up with what could be mistaken for a live small fish, a long strip with the eyes in front that's only 1/4 the size of a whole silverside and much more correct for juvenile predators.
I've actually gone so far as to "paint" eyes on the tail section with a magic marker and had it work.


__________________
"Nothing is carved in stone, and even if it were, the sea removes stones wave by wave"

Current Tank Info: 6:1)100g,2)125g,1)300g, 1) 25 hex seahorse, 1) 6 gal. fry rearing tank (and a hospital tank **grin**) all marine
M.Dandaneau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09/16/2004, 02:22 PM   #34
ghostbear29
Registered Member
 
ghostbear29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Rio Rico
Posts: 585
so now our fish ingest majic marker dye? What the heck? Please tell me it ain't so!


__________________
"whatever discount!"

Current Tank Info: 110 tall aggressive reef
ghostbear29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09/24/2004, 03:12 AM   #35
zemuron114
Moved On
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Pilgrim State (Mass)
Posts: 4,048
I feed all my aggressives fish, crabs, shrimp i catch from the ocean. hand cought with nets with a friend who has 2 8 inch porc puffers. I catch dozens of fidlers for my eel, and grass shrimp and small fish for lion and puffer and grouper. they love me!!1


zemuron114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/07/2004, 11:20 PM   #36
butterfly_cheeks
Registered Member
 
butterfly_cheeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern Utah
Posts: 122
I got a tank full of ich from a couple feeder fish.


__________________
As Always

Jen

Current Tank Info: 125 Gallons with Aggressive Fish
butterfly_cheeks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/25/2004, 02:17 AM   #37
Putawaywet
20 and over club
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Long Beach, CA.
Posts: 2,750
FWIW, I had the opportunity to observe a necropsy on a Voltan Lion that had succumbed to apparent natural causes. To everyone's surprise the liver cross sections uncovered an abundance of fatty deposits within the tissue.

This animal as well as it's tankmakes were fed 6-7 days/week on a mixed diet that consisted of alternating days of raw shrimp, clam and capelin. Needless to say, everyone in the tank appeared fat and happy with the emphesis on fat.

Post necropsy the diet was changed to a couple days of shrimp or clam, followed by a day or two of large krill, followed by a day of fasting.

Several years after the change in diet all fish have slimmed down significantly and there have been no additional losses that can be attributed to nutrition issues.

So, not only is it import what you feed to your animals, but the "how much" and "how often" plays a major part in the equation as well.

Brett


__________________
She ain't broke, but can we fix her more better?

Current Tank Info: A big box of water with some stuff in it.
Putawaywet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10/30/2004, 10:03 PM   #38
EdKruzel
Premium Member
 
EdKruzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 7,384
Brett,
Was there any signs of fat along the intestinal tract?

Active lions should receive only enough food to cause a noticeable bulge in the abdomen.
I would recommend feedings of three times a week.
Non-active or lions in small confines can be reduced to feeding once a week with occasional feedings of twice a week.

When I ran an Aquatic Rescue, lions were the number one saltwater inheritance.
Many would lay lethargic and not eat for weeks (some nearly a month) before thinning and becoming active.

Ed


__________________
When you find yourself in "Deep Water" it's best to keep your mouth shut!

Current Tank Info: 65RR Cube Mixed Reef
EdKruzel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11/02/2004, 10:58 AM   #39
ghostbear29
Registered Member
 
ghostbear29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Rio Rico
Posts: 585
ok, so for our smaller friends, everybody says mysid shrimp are the way to go. But they are a freshwater species. does this negate the shrimp or what?


__________________
"whatever discount!"

Current Tank Info: 110 tall aggressive reef
ghostbear29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11/18/2004, 05:24 PM   #40
orosepaul
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Taylor, PA
Posts: 3
Cool Feeding Moray Eels

Hello,
My name is Paul, I am a brand new owner of a juvnile Snowflake Moray Eel. It is only about six inches long, but seems to be afraid of the feeding probe. I have read and been told that hand feeding it is a big no - no. I have also tried feeding it the frozen krill meat, but prefers to grab the chunks of meat as it floats to him. How long will it take before it can be feed by a probe?


orosepaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11/20/2004, 12:56 PM   #41
EdKruzel
Premium Member
 
EdKruzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 7,384
Paul,

To Reef Central

Feeding by hand is a No-No because of accidents; eels have poor eye sight, your fingers will smell like bait and look as such.

There is no set time for the eel to begin feeding from a stick. Once it begins to feel comfortable and safe in its environment it will start; have patience.

Snowflakes are not piscivores (fish eaters), to remain healthy and happy feed it crustaceans, shrimp, crab, etc...

Good Luck,
Ed


__________________
When you find yourself in "Deep Water" it's best to keep your mouth shut!

Current Tank Info: 65RR Cube Mixed Reef
EdKruzel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12/10/2004, 12:20 PM   #42
Mad Scientist
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Mass
Posts: 2,777
I'm glad this article is here (and this thread discussing it), proprer diet is so important in keeping healthy and colorful SW fish.

For me, I'm a big mysis guy - it makes a large part of the diet for most of fish. I soak it in garlic, zoe and selcon.


__________________
"Failing to plan is planning to fail." DIVE SAFE

Current Tank Info: Starting over
Mad Scientist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12/10/2004, 12:32 PM   #43
Mad Scientist
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Mass
Posts: 2,777
Quote:
Originally posted by Putawaywet
FWIW, I had the opportunity to observe a necropsy on a Voltan Lion that had succumbed to apparent natural causes. To everyone's surprise the liver cross sections uncovered an abundance of fatty deposits within the tissue.

This animal as well as it's tankmakes were fed 6-7 days/week on a mixed diet that consisted of alternating days of raw shrimp, clam and capelin. Needless to say, everyone in the tank appeared fat and happy with the emphesis on fat.

Post necropsy the diet was changed to a couple days of shrimp or clam, followed by a day or two of large krill, followed by a day of fasting.

Several years after the change in diet all fish have slimmed down significantly and there have been no additional losses that can be attributed to nutrition issues.

So, not only is it import what you feed to your animals, but the "how much" and "how often" plays a major part in the equation as well.

Brett
Is it clear that diet and death by a "fatty" liver are directly realted? I would think that a number of conditions could cause fatty accumulation in the liver?

Were you having a rash of deaths from fatty livers (which then stopped when the diet was changed) or was the lion the only one?

I've very concerned about the health of my lions and I would interested in any additional information you could provide.

In the wild, I frequently observe "obese" fish - so I'm leary about placing judgment on a fish's appearance based on how i think they should look.

With a background in both commerical and "recrecation" fish breeding, it's not a surprise that I consider myself to be a very heavy feeder. I've been able to keep a number of my fish alive for over 7 years (and counting) but I don't want to loss any at 8 years due to something like this.


__________________
"Failing to plan is planning to fail." DIVE SAFE

Current Tank Info: Starting over
Mad Scientist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/02/2005, 10:05 AM   #44
jdav
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: ga
Posts: 366
sorry if i missed it in the article or thread, but if you don't mind spendng the money on feeding your fish live prey are damsels and asst. shrimp okay to feed them?


jdav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/02/2005, 10:28 AM   #45
EdKruzel
Premium Member
 
EdKruzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 7,384
That is fine; however damsels are quite crafty, before dumping one in a tank for a larger fish to eat, cut a fin off or a piece of the tail.
The wounded fish will have less chance of finding cover and the erratic swimming behavior will entice a feeding response.

Ed


__________________
When you find yourself in "Deep Water" it's best to keep your mouth shut!

Current Tank Info: 65RR Cube Mixed Reef
EdKruzel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02/21/2005, 10:43 AM   #46
aquaticjack
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Fresno
Posts: 14
Great Article I would have to strongly agree with Feeding Goldfish causing long term issues. Damsels are a bit more costly however better in the long run for the preidtor I have had a few large preditors that it took awhile to train to eat other things I have a large tessalata eel now that I am having that issue with but eventually it to will eat its natural diet..


aquaticjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03/12/2005, 01:24 AM   #47
unleashed13
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: northern michigan
Posts: 258
hello everyone I am new to this forum.I have 2 volitan lions sep tanks of course one is a juvenile 3-4 inches the other is an adult aprox 8 -10inches. after alot of reading and resarch but maily due to dr f marini I decided to offer my adult lion live food.after hrs of research I found that other than expencive chromis, black mollies were my best choice.I feed all of my fish a wide variety of foods mainly frozen prepared foods the mollies i keep in a seperate tank i am acclimating them to salt.to maintain nutritonal value of these live feeders they are also given a variety of diet such as cyclopseeze, veggie flakes and emerald entrees.also marine vitamin suppliments for all of my fish and garlic extreme with every feeding .these feeders are mainly for my panther grouper and the lion.they get the mollies once a week i will place 6 or so in the tank with in seconds they are eaten.but these are not used as main diet.their reg diet includes shrimp, squid ,scallops and krill. I don't reccomend any fresh water fish period especially goldfish. I do house 2 striped damels in the main tank they have been in the tank for 2 yrs.the lion pay no attention to them at all


unleashed13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06/07/2005, 04:01 PM   #48
Hockeyben51
Registered Member
 
Hockeyben51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Yorktown,VA
Posts: 732
I have a question, i live near areas that have an unlimited amount of minows and i am able to catch them reuglary becasue i do alot of sw fishing, but i want to know if i can feed these minows to my future trigger(s)? is this safe since these are saltwater fish?


__________________
-Ben

"What do you mean there is no such thing as the Money Tree?"

Current Tank Info: 75gal reef, 16gallon nano, 10gal quarintine
Hockeyben51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06/07/2005, 11:06 PM   #49
EdKruzel
Premium Member
 
EdKruzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 7,384
It's great for all the wild triggers in those waters; what can be better than Mother Nature!!!

By all means feed natural live foods when you can.

Ed


__________________
When you find yourself in "Deep Water" it's best to keep your mouth shut!

Current Tank Info: 65RR Cube Mixed Reef
EdKruzel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06/11/2005, 05:03 PM   #50
unleashed13
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: northern michigan
Posts: 258
Quote:
Originally posted by EdKruzel
It's great for all the wild triggers in those waters; what can be better than Mother Nature!!!

By all means feed natural live foods when you can.

Ed
well unfortunately although its a cheep way to feed it most likely isnt the best way to feed.because minows are fresh water fish their diets are much different than salt water fish .this could result in malnutrition for your fish.also polutants from your lakes could contaminate your stock resulting in illness or death.I would highly recomend thinking long and hard on this before taking the risk of killing off your fish.


unleashed13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:39 PM.


TapaTalk Enabled

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2017 Axivo Inc.
Use of this web site is subject to the terms and conditions described in the user agreement.
Reef CentralTM Reef Central, LLC. Copyright 1999-2014