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Unread 08/26/2014, 11:44 PM   #1
TheBookWorm
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Beginner to reef with seahorses?

Are seahorses suitable for beginners? I've done some research, and it seems doable.


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Unread 08/27/2014, 05:24 AM   #2
vlangel
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They have some particular needs that should be met for them to thrive. Seahorse.com by Ocean Rider offers a free online training course that is 10 lessons that will thoroughly equip you with all you need to know to keep seahorses. Its a do it at your own pace. There is an underlying implication that should you purchase seahorses, you purchase from them. It is an excellent course though.


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Unread 08/28/2014, 12:56 PM   #3
LAX Reef
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Is there recommendation breed for beg at seahorse?


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Unread 08/28/2014, 08:42 PM   #4
vlangel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAX Reef View Post
Is there recommendation breed for beg at seahorse?
I am a beginner but I've done a lot of reading and everything I see says that captive bred H erectus are the hardiest of the seahorse species.


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Unread 08/30/2014, 05:15 PM   #5
TheBookWorm
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Are H. reidi good for beginners?


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Unread 08/31/2014, 05:52 AM   #6
vlangel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBookWorm View Post
Are H. reidi good for beginners?
I think they can be trickier to keep. From what I've read they have not been captive bred as long or for as many generations as H erectus. As a result sometimes even the captive bred will stop eating the frozen mysis for a time and then have to be re-train to go back to frozen. Feeding live food for very long is both a challenge nutrition wise and expensive. Their babies are more challenging to raise as well which is why they have not been 'dometicated ' as long. As a beginner myself I am much more comfortable with H erectus.


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Unread 08/31/2014, 07:28 AM   #7
rayjay
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I started in 2002 with H. reidi and I've never heard that they haven't been captive bred as long, nor have I heard that they stop eating frozen because they haven't had as many captive bred generations.
I have heard of many species stopping eating frozen when given a lot of live food but it has nothing to do with captive bred or how many generations or what species they are IMO. It is often an individual rather than all seahorses in the tank that this may happen with.
It is true that the reidi pelagic fry are harder to raise as they are a bit smaller and they don't hitch at birth like the benthic erectus fry.
As for ease of keeping, I see no difference between erectus and reidi myself.


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Unread 08/31/2014, 12:58 PM   #8
TheBookWorm
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Okay, thanks.


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Unread 08/31/2014, 04:10 PM   #9
vlangel
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Quote:
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I started in 2002 with H. reidi and I've never heard that they haven't been captive bred as long, nor have I heard that they stop eating frozen because they haven't had as many captive bred generations.
I have heard of many species stopping eating frozen when given a lot of live food but it has nothing to do with captive bred or how many generations or what species they are IMO. It is often an individual rather than all seahorses in the tank that this may happen with.
It is true that the reidi pelagic fry are harder to raise as they are a bit smaller and they don't hitch at birth like the benthic erectus fry.
As for ease of keeping, I see no difference between erectus and reidi myself.

Rayjay has lots of experience and I personally have none, so I would definitely take his advise!


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Unread 08/31/2014, 07:27 PM   #10
rayjay
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Actually, when you are talking seahorses you should consider any experienced advice as there are more ways than one to succeed in the hobby.
However, there are certain basics that most experienced hobbyists have a basic agreement on for recommendations.
Check the links at the BOTTOM of "My Thoughts on Seahorse Keeping" written by experienced keepers and Dan Underwood of seahorsesource.
Also check the thread responding to "The Marine Depot Article" for more opinions on best chances of success.


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Unread 09/09/2014, 06:11 PM   #11
fishhuman
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The general aquarium keeping consensus is that seahorses need a species tank, they should not be in a reef tank because of stinging coral and the fact that they won't get enough food. You won't be able to keep them in a standard reef tank. Your other thread says that you have a 20 gallon aquarium, if I'm right this is not big enough for most seahorse species to add to that you plan on having other fish. Seahorses are not beginner fish.


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Unread 09/09/2014, 07:05 PM   #12
TheBookWorm
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I was just thinking, but I have since convinced myself against starting out with seahorses, and Seahorsesource.com recommends H. barbouri for a tank of no less than 20 gallons. If you plan out the reef tank around the seahorses, it actually should be okay, I would think, if you were careful to avoid adding stinging corals.


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Unread 09/09/2014, 08:02 PM   #13
rayjay
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There is a little bit more to it than just avoiding stinging corals.
For example, as the temperature recommended for tropical seahorses is 68 to 74F, many corals will not do well, and some won't last at that temperature range.
Some corals need high lighting that may heat the water above the range and require the use of a chiller.
There are also some corals that won't do well in the "dirty" water produced in a seahorse tank.


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Unread 09/10/2014, 08:25 PM   #14
fishhuman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBookWorm View Post
I was just thinking, but I have since convinced myself against starting out with seahorses, and Seahorsesource.com recommends H. barbouri for a tank of no less than 20 gallons. If you plan out the reef tank around the seahorses, it actually should be okay, I would think, if you were careful to avoid adding stinging corals.
Very appealing to beginners but you will soon find it is not an interesting fish they mostly hang out in one spot are rarely out and moving and are a pain to feed. Not a beginner fish


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Unread 09/10/2014, 10:11 PM   #15
funkejj
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We have a reef tank and a seahorse tank. We have coral in both but the seahorse tank the coral doubles as hitching posts for the horses. Starting your first tank asa seahorse tank is probably a mistake, couple that as wanting a full blown reef is just asking for problems. We have had horses for nearly 3 years now. We have made mistakes and learned from them. You need to be some what experienced with SW tanks before tackling this.


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